Career & Specialty Advisors

Career advisors are available to guide you through the specialty selection and residency application process. Confidential advisors are not part of their department-specific residency intern selection committee. Please find your desired department/specialty (following) for detailed career information prepared by these specific advisors.

Meet the Directors of the Career Advising Program & the Associate Dean of Students

Dr. Brent Kobashi and Dr. Heather Whelan are your Directors of the Career Advising Program and are outstanding resources for general career advising. Please schedule an appointment with either of them for career planning guidance. In addition, Associate Dean of Students, Dr. Lee Jones, is an extra resource for you as he can provide supplemental support and tools for your success, as well as refer you to other faculty for advice. Please email him to ask any questions you may have or to schedule an appointment.

Your Personal Guides to Specialty Career Information

Specialty advisors are selected by their departments to support students with the best career advice for their respective specialties. There are confidential and non-confidential specialty advisors for each specialty. The main distinction is that confidential advisors are not on the residency selection committee, and do not share information about students with whom they have met with the selection committee. Meeting with the confidential advisor in a specialty is ideal for students who have not yet decided whether to pursue a specialty, but need to speak openly and honestly with a faculty person in the field to get advice. 

Specialty advisors are particularly helpful in providing guidance to students regarding competitiveness within a chosen specialty, whether away rotations are necessary for applications, reviewing students’ personal statement and CVs, and creating and finalizing match lists. Both specialty career advisors can provide guidance about/to the following:

  • Requirements for residency application and selection criteria for residency
  • Clinical shadowing experiences, informational interviews, electives, research opportunities and other extracurricular activities that can help students become a competitive residency applicant
  • How to find a Deep Explore Inquiry project and/or mentor related to a student’s desired specialty
  • Most recent data for those matching in this specialty in the previous year’s Match, both nationally and at UCSF, including average Step 1 scores, grades, extracurricular activities, and which programs are most competitive
  • Students whose academic performance is not optimal for a competitive application in the specialty
  • Necessary or desired away rotations for students to pursue in their desired specialty
  • Specific residency programs in which the student might be competitive
  • Reviewing a student’s personal statement and CV for residency application
  • Creating and finalizing student Match lists

Career Fields & Specialty Advisors

Anesthesia

Contact Anesthesia Advisors


NON-CONFIDENTIAL

 

 


Statistics on UCSF students in 2018-19 who were matched into Anesthesia residency programs:

POST-MATCH REPORT 

What can students do in the 1st and 2nd years to explore and/or prepare for this career?

  • Shadow an anesthesiologist at UCSF or in private practice. You can spend a day (or part of a day) with a faculty member in the operating room, preoperative evaluation clinic, pain management unit or critical care unit. This will give you exposure to these unique clinical areas, as well as provide an opportunity to interact informally with the faculty. If you are interested in participating, particularly during your free time, please contact Marie Lim to help you coordinate with a faculty.
  • Join the anesthesia interest group, which will keep you up to date on activities and information within the specialty of anesthesia.
  • Please email Marie Lim at [email protected]

What common variations exist in the length/content of residency programs for this career?

Internship can be in medicine, transitional, surgery, pediatrics or OB/GYN, but more programs are integrating the internship into the residency (called “categorical” tracks). The three-year anesthesia residency follows the Intern year. Fellowship training is available in a variety of areas that are each one-year long and include:

  • ACGME certified subspecialties: Pain management, hospice & palliative medicine, critical care medicine, pediatric anesthesia, cardiac anesthesia and obstetric anesthesia. Regional and acute pain medicine will become an ACGME fellowship in the next year.
  • Non-ACGME subspecialties: Transplant anesthesia, neuroanesthesia, outpatient clinic management, research, QI and others.

What common variations exist in this career after training?  Private or academic practice.

Varying degrees of subspecialization are common, with more sub-specialization in academic settings. Private practice venues include large hospitals, small hospitals, outpatient units, and even office settings.

Practice may include working alone, with residents, CRNAs, anesthesia assistants or a combination of perioperative care extenders.

What is a typical workday for someone in this field?

For the anesthesiologist in private practice, a typical clinical day is 10 to 12 hours long, plus overnight call two+ nights each month. The average number of hours per week depends on the group and its call structure, but typically 40-60 hours per week, including call. In an academic setting (the minority of anesthesiologists), there is great variability depending on additional responsibilities outside the clinical setting. Overall, there is a high degree of satisfaction with anesthesiology as a career choice.

What is the culture of this career?

Patients range from all ages; the OR environment is exciting and fun. Anesthesia is often challenging and always humbling. Many like paying attention to one or two patients at a time. The patient contact can be the most satisfying part of the profession.
 Many anesthesiologists work part time and the career allows this flexibility. Sometimes anesthesia is labeled as a “lifestyle” specialty. There are aspects of that label which ring true, such as the potential flexibility of scheduling clinical work on a day-by-day or week-by-week basis, as opposed to those specialties which require building a practice consistently over the long-term with longitudinal patient care interactions. There are other aspects of anesthesia practice that may not appeal to your lifestyle, such as the requirement for in-house overnight call in most practice settings. In addition, many anesthesia groups try to run their groups “lean,” which means less flexibility in accommodating call or vacation requests. This is extremely dependent on the specific practice, but the groups with the highest compensation rates tend to do the most call and work the most hours in a given area. 

How compatible is this career with raising a family? How is this different for men and women?

Overall, very compatible, but will depend on the specific group practice. Smaller groups tend to have less flexibility. There are some aspects of childcare that can be challenging, such as the need for childcare early in the morning in order to work in the operating room by 7 am. This will depend on your particular family situation as well.

What are the most important qualities or character traits for a person in this field?

Valuable traits include the following: honesty, strong work ethic, leadership abilities, emotional intelligence, empathy, vigilance, ability to think and communicate in fast-paced settings, appropriate humility, attention to detail. 

How competitive are the residency programs in this field?

Over the years, residency in anesthesia has waxed and waned in competitiveness and desirability. Currently, anesthesiology is considered quite competitive. An average resident applicant from a US allopathic medical school applies to 18 programs.

What programs have been popular among UCSF applicants, or how should applicants go about considering programs?

UCSF medical students are considered strong candidates for many excellent programs, including: UCSF, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, MGH, Johns Hopkins, U of WA, Stanford, Columbia, UCLA, UCSD, Duke, Oregon, Wash U and others. Career goals, philosophy of training program, structure and location are often considered more important to many applicants than the so-called “tier” of the program.


What resources (e.g., websites, books, professional groups) would you recommend for students interested in learning more about this field?

The UCSF Anesthesia Interest Group is the best resource for UCSF students because the advice and information is tailored to UCSF students. Other sources include the ASA medical student section, the Society for Education in Anesthesia and the ACGME.

How important is each the following for admission to a competitive program?

  Not important Somewhat important Very important
Extra-curricular leadership efforts     X
Research/publications   X  
Honors in third year     X
AOA   X  
A sub-internship X    
An externship X    
Board scores   X  
Top-tier medical school   X S
Dermatology

Contact Dermatology Advisors 


NON-CONFIDENTIAL

 

 

 

CONFIDENTIAL

 

 


Statistics on UCSF students in 2018-19 who were matched into Dermatology residency programs:

POST-MATCH REPORT 

What can students do in the 1st and 2nd years to explore and/or prepare for this career?
Since exposure to dermatology is rare during the 1st and 2nd years of medical school, the key is getting involved:       

  • Join the Dermatology Interest Group (DIG): great way to find out about informational workshops/ meetings/ career panels, volunteer events, research opportunities. [contact: [email protected]]
  • Participate in Dermatology Homeless Clinic: part of the UCSF Homeless clinic, the dermatology clinic meets every other week and focuses on cutaneous complaints of shelter residents.  It’s a rich opportunity to learn clinical dermatology and meet different dermatology residents and faculty members, who precept the clinic. There are also great leadership opportunities to serve as coordinators for this clinic. Each year one to two students are selected to serve as coordinators for derm homeless clinic and these students hold these positions for all 4 years [contact: [email protected]]
  • Get a mentor.  There is an active mentoring program through the DIG, where DIG members are individually paired with a career mentor.
  • Consider doing a research project over the summer after 1st year: this is a project that could culminate in a research poster, a meeting abstract, or possibly a publication (the latter usually requires ongoing work during the academic year). 
  • Explore the American Academy of Dermatology’s online dermatology modules
  • Attend the bi-annual meetings of the San Francisco Dermatologic Society. This is a wonderful opportunity to hear dermatology experts speak about their clinical interests and research, see interesting case presentations, and interact with trainees and faculty of UCSF and Stanford, as well as dermatologists from the Bay Area.

What common variations exist in the length/content of residency programs for this career?

  • Traditional residency program: internship (internal medicine, surgery, pediatrics, or transitional year) + 3 clinical dermatology years. Unless you are strongly considering pediatric dermatology, internal medicine internship is looked upon most favorably (preliminary year in medicine is recommended over a transitional year).
  • 2+2 research program (offered by some, but not all, departments): internship + 2 years of clinical dermatology + 2 (or more) years of integrated research and clinical exposure.  The research is almost always basic science, not clinical research, and these track positions are almost exclusively filled by individuals with advanced scientific degrees (masters, PhD).
  • Dermatology and Internal Medicine combined residency programs: 5 years total of combined training and board certification in both specialties (not offered at UCSF). Visit American Board of Internal Medicine's (ABIM) Internal Medicine / Dermatology Policies for a description of the combined program with participating institutions

What common variations exist in this career after training?

There are four post-residency fellowship opportunities:

  1. Procedural dermatology: 1 year, specialized surgical training that includes advanced training in Mohs Micrographic surgery, reconstructive surgery, cosmetics (botulinum toxin, fillers, lasers, liposuction) procedures.
  2. Pediatric dermatology: 1 year, specialized training in treating skin disorders in children.  Preference for fellowship selection is given to individuals who have done a pediatrics residency or a pediatrics internship.
  3. Dermatopathology: 1-2 years, specialized training in reading biopsies of skin malignancies and inflammatory disorders. Both dermatology and anatomic pathology residents are eligible for dermatopathology training.
  4. Medical dermatology: 1 year, specialized training in complex medical dermatology, including disorders of skin with significant systemic manifestations and the use of systemic immunosuppression. There are specific programs that focus on areas within medical dermatology, such as rheumatology/dermatology.

What is a typical workday for someone in this field?

Depends on chosen subspecialty. The typical dermatologist will see 30-50 patients a day with a mix of procedures, cosmetics, medical dermatology visits.  Almost all dermatologists do quite a bit of surgery: dermatologists do a number of surgical procedures (biopsies, cancer excisions) as well as cosmetic procedures (botulinum toxin, filler, chemical peels, lasers, liposuction, vein sclerotherapy). Most dermatologists have nights and weekends off though the high clinical volume requires a significant amount of pager call (i.e. answering phone calls).  Since the specialty is primarily outpatient, the typical workday starts at 8am and ends at 6pm.  Some dermatologists that are affiliated with large hospitals may be part of inpatient dermatology consult services (typically seen after the clinic day ends).

What is the culture of this career?

  • Dermatology is a very small field—many dermatologists know one another and the small size of our specialty and frequent meeting opportunities allows wonderful connections between dermatologists who live all over the world.  Dermatologists are highly involved with their specialty with excellent participation in local organizations (such as San Francisco Dermatology, CalDerm and other state and national societies).
  • People who typically choose this field have a preference for: doing procedures, thinking about a broad spectrum of diseases (almost every disease has a cutaneous manifestation), highly academic people (requires a very large fund of knowledge, residency is reading-intensive), variety of ages seen (from children to the elderly), variety of conditions seen (mole checks to systemic lupus), variety of health status (from very healthy to very sick), doing cosmetic procedures, seeing high volume of patients during short visits (typical dermatologist sees 30-50 patients a day), dedicated to giving back to the specialty.

How compatible is this career with raising a family? How is this different for men and women?

Most dermatologists enjoy excellent work-life balance due to a largely outpatient practice, no inpatient/ overnight call, and flexible days worked.

What are the most important qualities or character traits for a person in this field?

  • Self-motivated
  • Enjoys high clinical volume, lots of variety in their clinical practices
  • Enjoys and is adept at performing procedures
  • Ability to master clinical material across a broad spectrum of diseases and disorders
  • Prioritizes commitment to serving/giving back to the specialty, being part of the dermatology community

How competitive are the residency programs in this field?

This is a relatively competitive residency program process.  The typical applicant applies to 60-80 programs, will be invited to 5-15 interviews.  Each interview will entail 1-2 days visiting a program and having approximately 8-10 individual or panel interviews typically lasting ~10-20 minutes each during that visit.  The 2014 AAMC data for outcomes from the match for dermatology are:

summary statistics of residency programs in dermatology

Students at UCSF typically do very well with the residency match process.  The key is to have good mentorship throughout the application process, including an individual or two (typically academic faculty) who will mentor you and advocate on your behalf through writing you a highly individualized letter of recommendation and calling programs to support your application.

How competitive is the job market after residency?

Depends on the type of practice and geographic location.  Job opportunities for dermatopathologists and dermatologic surgeons are rare in the big cities but there is great need for these specialists in more suburban/rural locations.  Pediatric and medical dermatologists are highly sought after, though some cities are saturated (NYC, LA, SF).  There is tremendous need for general dermatologists (individuals who do all types of dermatology) in rural areas.

The average starting salary of a general dermatologist who works 4-5 days a week in an urban setting (2016) is approximately $325,000.

What programs have been popular among UCSF applicants, or how should applicants go about considering programs?

The top dermatology programs in the country include: UCSF, UCLA, U Penn, NYU, Harvard, Columbia, Stanford, Northwestern.

Applicants are strongly encouraged to apply broadly across the United States. The typical applicant will apply to 60-80 programs though an extremely strong candidate could successfully match with 30-40 applications.  Research-oriented applicants to the 2+2 program would likely apply to 30-40 programs as there are fewer programs nationwide that support such research-oriented trainees.

Key considerations include: opportunity to see a broad variety of diseases, types of patients, opportunity to work in different clinical settings (VA, county system, upscale practice, community practice, inpatient hospital), availability of experts in different specialties (ie pediatric dermatology, hospital dermatology, dermatologic surgery, dermatopathology), the size of a program (ranges from 3-21 residents), clinical teaching faculty, didactic curriculum (is it resident-led or faculty-taught?), research opportunities (if desired), track record with developing academic careers/mentorship. Cost of living is also an important consideration for individuals applying to residency.

Please note that there can be a disconnect between the reputation of a medical school and the dermatology residency training (i.e. there are SUPERB dermatology residency programs at medical schools that you may have never heard of (and vice versa). It is important to review the list of programs with a mentor.

What resources (eg, websites, books, professional groups) would you recommend for students interested in learning more about this field?

  • AAMC
  • American Academy of Dermatology
  • Society for Pediatric Dermatology
  • American Society of Dermatopathology
  • American Society of Dermatologic Surgery, Mohs College Society
  • Medical Dermatology Society
  • Dermatology Foundation
  • National Psoriasis Foundation
  • San Francisco Dermatologic Society

How important is each the following for admission to a competitive program?

 

Very Important

Somewhat Important

Not Important

Comments

USMLE Step 1, 2

 

x

 

Board scores are not as important as they used to be. See mean scores of matched applicants in the AAMC table. A score of <225 may be problematic depending on the strength of the rest of your application. The key issue with board scores is that some programs still continue to use board scores as a “cutoff” for screening applicants. This cutoff is usually 200-225 and sometimes higher. It will be very difficult, and possibly impossible, to match in dermatology with a board score of <200 or if the board was not passed on the first attempt.

Extracurricular/
volunteer work

X

 

 

Recommend more significant involvement in a few organizations rather than superficial involvement in many; leadership positions are notable.

Research/publications

X

 

 

Recommend research in dermatology >> other specialties. Original research papers are more highly regarded over case reports (500 words).

If an applicant has strong research background in another field (such as PhD in basic science or in another medical specialty), it is still recommended that they do some research in dermatology.

Honors in third year

X

 

 

Strong candidates have honors in >50% 3rd-year clerkships. At the most competitive programs, honors in all clerkships is typical of the applicants who are ranked highly. Honors in core rotations such as internal medicine, surgery, pediatrics is especially important.

AOA

X

 

 

 

Subinternship

X

 

 

 

Externship

 

X

 

May consider an away elective on the east coast or mid-west if the student is “born, raised, and schooled” entirely in California. There is significant geographic bias in the residency selection process whereby individuals who have done all of their schooling in California typically do not leave the west coast and thus are disadvantaged when applying to mid-west or East coast programs.  Consider doing an away elective at NYU, U Penn, Harvard, Columbia. This should be discussed with a mentor.

Other: experience in dermatology (clinical, research, or otherwise)
 

X

 

 

It is virtually impossible for a student to match in dermatology if they have never done a clinical rotation, research project, or volunteer experience in dermatology.

Letters of recommendation

XXX

 

 

Need 2-3 VERY STRONG letters of recommendation from dermatologists, ideally well-known (senior) academic dermatologists.  

Timing: The letters (and ERAS application) are due October 1st of 4thyear so please give your letter writers at least 4 weeks to write your letter. It is important to note that if you are scheduled to do a dermatology elective in September, it will likely not be possible to get a letter of recommendation from that elective as there will not be enough time for the letter-writer to get to know you well enough to write a high quality letter.

Goals: An ideal application includes 3 strong dermatology references and an excellent letter of support from internal medicine. Your letter writers should speak about your clinical skills, your research excellence, your personal attributes (not every letter writer needs to address all points but they should be covered somewhere and you can direct letter writers to cover a particular topic if you do not think it will be covered by other writers.)

Please note: if you have a dermatology research mentor at another institution (ie from a summer experience), it is still very important to get a letter from your home school (ie UCSF) to demonstrate that you have connected with your home department; because you are a UCSF student, it is highly likely that faculty at other schools will call faculty at UCSF to inquire about you.

What are my chances of matching? Is it too late to consider dermatology as a specialty?

We highly recommend that you meet with your mentor AS EARLY AS POSSIBLE to review your board scores, clinical grades, CV, and discuss your career goals. You advisor can help you estimate your chances of matching and areas of your application that you may wish to strengthen, and whether you need to take a year off to develop your commitment to dermatology. If you have any areas of grave concern (i.e. very low board score, failed a clerkship), please discuss with one of the residency program directors or the confidential dermatology advisor as they have more experience in strategies for dealing with this.

Is it too late? It is generally not recommended to try to apply in dermatology if you have not had any clinical or research experience in dermatology by the summer of 4th year. Why: you will not have enough experience in dermatology or connections to get strong support for your application. In these cases, it may be worth taking time off, or applying to internship only, and pursuing a clinical or research fellowship in dermatology after internship, then applying later.

Once you apply, you'll know a lot based on the number of interviews you get. The magic number of interviews that suggests a high likelihood of matching is around 7. If you have fewer than 4, you may want to consider a backup plan. Not matching is not a disaster; the match rate for second round applicants is still high. Most of the individuals who match on the second try do so with a notably improved application with new publications, fellowship experiences, etc – i.e. do not submit the same application as in 4th year. Third and fourth attempts to match are generally not successful.

What should I do if my board scores are low?

• Electives and research experiences for students with scores lower than 225 can be key.

Some programs do screen applicants based on scores and if they know you, they are more likely to pull your file for an interview anyway. Some options for students with lower board scores include: taking a year off and doing a productive research project, doing a research fellowship (after internship) in clinical research, cutaneous oncology, psoriasis, hair/nail, etc.

• A word on taking a year off between 3rd and 4th year: It is not essential but may be recommended if other components of your application are weak.  However, please note that a research year must be productive and highly mentored. A year without publication or some other tangible result may hurt rather than help.

• If you are planning to take a year off, you should contact the program director(s) of the Pathway relevant to your interests (e.g., Clinical and Translational Research, Molecular Medicine, Global Health) < http://meded.ucsf.edu/pathways/five-pathways > so that you can find out options for funding and important application deadlines. In addition to the general intramural funding within UCSF, students may be able to apply simultaneously for funding through specific programs depending on their interests. For example, students with basic science projects can apply for the Howard Hughes Medical Institute Medical Research Fellows Program (this award is highly competitive). Students with global health projects can apply for Doris Duke International Clinical Research Fellowship. Students from underrepresented in medicine backgrounds and students interested in health disparities research (regardless of background) can apply for funding through PROF-PATH (Promoting Research Opportunities Fully – Prospective Academics Transforming Health).  Deadlines for these applications are relatively early. Students must meet with advisory college mentors, program directors, and mentors before submitting a letter of intent to pursue a yearlong project in October of MS3. Project proposals are initially reviewed in December, and final submissions (including multiple letters of recommendation) are due in January. The process requires significant planning, so it is advisable to identify a mentor and project as early as possible. Overall, about 70% of students applying for Pathways are funded. Additional derm-specific funding sources may be available through the American Dermatology Association, American Skin Association, North American Contact Dermatitis Society, and American Acne and Rosacea Society.

Advice on personal statements?

  • It can be hard to write a statement that stands out and unfortunately many of them sound the same. You want to leave the reader with something that is memorable about you, but not too much of an outlier. Don't be afraid to be explicit about your goals and show it to some people you trust. But don't show it to too many people - it dilutes the originality and personal voice that really has to come through.
  • Though you want the statement to be personal, it is generally not recommended to describe a cutaneous condition that you have experienced (severe acne, atopic dermatitis, psoriasis, melanoma) unless you have a very unique aspect of this that you would like to discuss or explore.  This is a common pitfall for students (i.e. many students write about this and thus it ends up not being very original).
  • It is generally recommended for the style to be straightforward, easy to read, and succinct.  Do not attempt to be creative or artsy unless creative writing is really your forte.  Be certain to not obscure the message of your qualifications and commitment to the specialty with your artistic flair.
  • A general format would be:
    • Paragraph 1: I want to be a dermatologist because (ie how you decided on derm) and be clear on why you are a doctor.
    • Paragraph 2: describe your experiences, accomplishments in dermatology. Be specific and be comfortable highlighting your successes. i.e., “I collaborated with Dr. John Smith of University to perform analysis of melanomas taken from 340 patients to determine the patterns of XYZ staining and associate the relevance of this staining pattern to patient prognosis and survivorship; this work resulted in an oral presentation at the annual AAD meeting in Denver 2014 and also a first-author publication in the JAAD.” In the essay be gracious to your mentors (OK to name drop).
    • Paragraph 3: Summarize your story, your path to dermatology and indicate whether there are any particular career aspirations (ie to become a pediatric dermatologist – only state this if this is 100% certain, otherwise ok to leave this more general)
  • The personal statement is a really good chance to explain any particular circumstances: low board score (because of illness, death in family), why you are switching from another specialty into dermatology, why you want to move to Chicago (because partner is being relocated there or your entire family lives there).  Please seek guidance on this aspect from mentors to make sure that the circumstances you hope to describe are appropriate and properly worded.

What do I do if I am asked to draft my own letter of recommendation?

  • This sounds a bit awkward at first, but it turns out to be both routine and to your advantage. It saves the writer time and allows you to put in the time and effort in the areas that are really important to you. It is also a chance to emphasize thematic points that will be consistent with the rest of your application or highlight things that you want to get extra attention that might not be obvious to the writer.
  • One basic outline is:
    • Paragraph 1: What is the relationship, ie How do you know each other and how long have you worked together?
    • Paragraph 2: What you have accomplished
    • Paragraph 3: Personal attributes.  This is the hardest part for most people. This it is an opportunity if there are themes you want to highlight so feel free to take a stab at it.
    • Paragraph 4: Summary paragraph. Good for a line or two that is the impression you want to leave with the readers.
  • To make it easy to read, keep it to one page. Put in ERAS information also - it also saves the writer time from having to look it up.

Should I apply in something else as a back-up plan?

• This should be discussed with your mentor or with the confidential dermatology advisor.  First, it is logistically very difficult to interview for dermatology, internship, and a 2nd specialty at the same time, unless the internship program (ie internal medicine) is the same as the 2nd specialty.  You do not want to create such a hectic interview schedule that you show up to your dermatology interview(s) exhausted! 

• If you have been counseled that your chances of matching in dermatology are very low, but you still wish to apply: consider applying broadly in dermatology (plus internship) and your 2nd specialty and see where you get interviews.  If you get only 1-2 dermatology interviews, then it will likely be possible to interview in both specialties, and then list dermatology at the top of your rank list.  However, if you decide to rank the 2nd specialty, do so with caution. If you are even remotely a good candidate for dermatology, you will likely be a very strong candidate for a 2nd specialty and may match in that specialty.  Because matching is a binding agreement, it will be very difficult to switch later.  Bottom line: it is important to decide whether your priority is to match in dermatology (and risk not matching, then apply again later) or whether your priority is to match in something (then okay to rank both specialties). Please seek advice and mentorship if you are considering this.

How do I find a research mentor? What type of research should I do?

• Join the DIG mentoring program: there is individualized pairing of mentees/ mentors.  This person will be your main career mentor.  It’s okay if their research interest isn’t exactly aligned with yours – they will be a very valuable resource to help you find research mentors/ projects either here at UCSF or at another institution.

• Look at the UCSF Department of Dermatology website for research interests of faculty and contact a mentor directly.  After establishing a mentorship relationship, it is advisable to notify the current career advisors for dermatology. The advisors play an important role in the application process (including responding to outside programs’ inquiries about students), so it is best if they are familiar with your derm-related projects/activities.

•  It is strongly recommended that you limit the number of mentors to focus on deeper relationships rather than talking with/ doing research with many mentors. There are limited mentors in the department so consider switching mentors if you feel that a mentoring relationship isn’t working rather than accumulating multiple mentors. It is also strongly recommended that your primary mentor is somebody other than the residency program director or the confidential derm advisor.

  • Talk to current Residents in the Dermatology Department or previous students who have matched into Dermatology from UCSF (see recent match lists).  They can often give advice regarding good mentorship and perspective on the faculty you are considering doing research with. 

• Consider what types of projects you have time for.  Remember that any clinical research will likely entail writing an IRB or recruiting patients and will require time – a summer at the very least but more likely a year off.  Though first year seems very busy, it is one of the least busy years of medical school and possibly the best time to engage in a research project if you are managing the academic load well.  The summer between 1st and 2nd year, 2nd year, and 4th year are other good times to pursue ongoing research.  It is very difficult to do research during 3rd year.  Be transparent with your mentors about what types of obligations you have with school or clerkships to ensure that your timeline meets theirs.  In general, it is recommended to consider some type of clinical case series or clinical review (which is almost guaranteed publication) in addition to an original research project (which are typically more time consuming and not guaranteed to be published).

• Aim to submit your research publications by the summer of 4th year at the latest.  The ERAS application will require you to list submitted manuscripts separate from works that are published; in general submitted manuscripts are not as highly regarded because there was a study that demonstrated that very few manuscripts listed as submitted were ultimately published (this study was done specifically on dermatology applicants).

• Please note: it is not necessary to do multiple research projects with different faculty (in fact this is strongly discouraged). 

• It is imperative to make every attempt to FINISH any projects that you start, and to complete them according to your research mentor’s expected timeline; failure to fulfill a project commitment or to meet a deadline may result in losing your research mentor’s support and possibly even their willingness to write you a letter of support.

• There are several opportunities to engage in research during residency and in fellowships.  A 2+2 program or a year off are not the last opportunity and are not required to have an academic career.

• Think about funding options – some are general funding, while others are more relevant depending on the research project.  Do your homework and ask your mentor if any of these funding options make sense: Dean’s research award, grants through CTSI RAP program, American Dermatology Association grant, American Skin Association, North American Contact Dermatitis Society.

What 3rd year clerkship program should I do? (Traditional, VALOR, MODEL SFGH, PISCES, KLIC, LIFE, etc)

  • UCSF SOM offers a variety of programs that students may choose for 3rd year clerkships.  These programs provide a wonderful array of unique opportunities to work with specific communities and populations.  The deadline to choose is often in the winter quarter of 2nd year.  It is important to note that there is no "right" or "wrong" program for a derm applicant – different students have gone through different programs and have successfully matched.  The choice of a 3rd year clerkship program is a highly personal one and should be based on your desire to work with certain communities/patient populations and how you best learn as a student. 
  • DIG will provide an informational session to all 2nd years that will cover this decision. 

Planning considerations for 3rd year:

Consider doing the 140.01 elective (2 week basic dermatology elective), if available/ feasible. It is strongly recommended to do this in the second half of the year, after you have more clinical experience under your belt, as you would want to perform strongly in this rotation.  However, a benefit of taking it earlier (in the first half of the year) would be if you are torn between two potential future specialties and want to make a decision sooner rather than later.  This would be an important point to discuss with your mentor.

Planning considerations for 4th year: remember, ERAS application must be completed by October 1st, which is when the dean’s letter (aka MSPE) is uploaded.  Oct 1 is the deadline for a majority of dermatology programs.  Keep in mind that ERAS application opens September 15th which is often when a majority students submit their internal medicine application (relevant if you are applying into an internal medicine preliminary/transitional year).  Thus it may be worthwhile to submit your application by September 15th.  Some preliminary internal medicine programs do send out interview invitations in the time between Sept 15th and Oct 1st.

• Try to do dermatology as early as possible.  Take the 140.01 basic 2 week elective back-to-back with the 2 week 140.08 advanced elective.  You will choose the focus of your 140.08 elective when you arrive for the 140.01 (as faculty schedules/ availability changes).  Consider doing a 150.01 research elective during the late spring or early summer to finish up writing any manuscripts you have been working on so that you can submit them as early in the summer as possible.

• Do your medicine sub-I in the beginning of your 4th year - late spring/early summer.  It is preferable to have your medicine sub-I grade before your application is due, and this is often where some students choose to get one of their Medicine letters of recommendation.

• Take USMLE Step 2 CK at a time so that your score will be reported on your ERAS application (ideally before September 1)

• Plan for any away electives to be during the summer (ideally before September 1st) if you are planning to get a letter of recommendation from that rotation (see above table on letters of recommendation).

• Do you need to do an away elective? Consider it if: you are “born, raised, schooled” exclusively in California (see #12 table above), if you have a particular program that you would like to match in (consider this an “audition” rotation), or if you have nothing to lose (i.e. you are not a strong candidate because of grades, board scores, but you would really like to try to match because you feel that your personality/clinical skills shine best in person).  If you “look perfect” on paper, there are potential risks to doing an away elective and it may be in your best interest to not rotate outside of UCSF.  However, doing an away elective is by no means a guarantee that you will get a letter of recommendation or an interview from that institution.

• You do not need to do multiple away electives. Presumably, you will be a dermatologist in the future so you should instead take the necessary electives to prepare yourself for internship (i.e. how to read an EKG, radiology, procedures courses, cardiology, ID, rheumatology elective, etc).

• Plan to take the entire month of January and possibly also December (if possible) for interviews.  As it may be difficult to navigate with limited vacation time, you may consider doing a more flexible research month.  Most dermatology interviews are in January and are only offered on 1 day so it is imperative that your schedule is as flexible as possible.

• An overview of highlights of the 4th year are:

      - June-mid-August: peak season for doing dermatology electives, derm research, one sub-I (preferably medicine unless you are pursuing pediatric internship year – in that case, then a pediatric sub-I is more relevant), taking Step 2 CK, and writing your personal statement

      - mid-August: recommend to take Step 2 CK before this date, as it will require approximately 4-6 weeks to get your scores posted to your ERAS file.  It is strongly recommended, though not essential, to have your Step 2 CK score included on your ERAS file; it is an important data point for many programs.  If you have a weak Step 1 score, it is IMPERATIVE to have your Step 2 CK score included on your ERAS file (hopefully improved).  Please take Step 2 CS according to the SOM guidelines (not an important consideration for dermatology residency)

- ERAS application opens in mid-August or early September so you can begin to work on your application online (without officially sending it to programs yet)

- September 1: last day to ask faculty to write a letter of recommendation.  This is not a firm deadline but more of a suggestion of courtesy – giving a faculty member 4 weeks to write a letter is standard and the letter is due in final form by October 1st.  This means that it may be important to do any dermatology elective with a faculty member from whom you are hoping to get a letter at the latest in August.

- September 15th – First possible day to submit your application on ERAS.  This is often when a majority of internal medicine applicants submit their application.  This is relevant if you are doing a preliminary/transitional internal medicine year.  Some prelim programs send out interview invitations between Sept 15th and Oct 1st.

- October 1st: MSPE (aka Dean’s letter) is posted.  Most programs download their apps on this day so it is essential that all of your application and letters are submitted before this date.

- October/ November/December: preliminary year interviews

- January >>> December: dermatology interviews

- mid-February: rank lists are due

- mid-March: MATCH!

What’s the most important piece of advice for a student applying in dermatology?

• MENTORSHIP is the key to successfully matching in dermatology.  If you are considering a career in dermatology, it would be worthwhile to (a) join the DIG and (b) establish a relationship with a dermatology mentor, and to do these as early as possible.  Please note that it is not necessary to meet with multiple mentors (and in fact is strongly recommended against).  You should have a key career mentor (which you can get through the DIG mentorship program) and perhaps also a research mentor (if you are doing research in an area outside of your career mentor).  It would be worthwhile to meet with ONE of the residency program directors (currently Kanade Shinkai and Erin Mathes) or the confidential dermatology advisor (Amanda “Mandy” Raymond) at some point when you have officially decided to apply in dermatology; please note it is only necessary to meet with ONE of them, not all three.

• Attend as many DIG workshops/panel discussions as possible.  These are HIGH-YIELD sessions and can make your mentorship meetings more individualized to discussions re: your specific career goals, needs.

• Please consult your mentor frequently to help you navigate the residency application process.  Key decisions:

  • picking a research mentor/ research project
  • 3rd year scheduling, choosing a 3rd year track
  • 4th year scheduling, including away electives and whether to take a year off
  • which programs, how many programs to apply to
  • which programs, how many programs to interview at
  • how to rank programs/ how to reach out to/ communicate with your top choice program.  This is an important step following interviews and you should set up a mentor meeting to specifically discuss this.
Diagnostic Radiology

Contact Diagnostic Radiology Advisors


NON-CONFIDENTIAL

 

 

CONFIDENTIAL

 


Statistics on UCSF students in 2018-19 who were matched into Diagnostic Radiology residency programs:

POST-MATCH REPORT 

  1. What can students do in the 1st and 2nd years to explore and/or prepare for this career?
    • Step 1 scores are important! Study hard!
    • Get involved in a research project early
    • Join the Radiology Interest Group
    • Consider joining some professional radiology societies such as the RSNA, ARRS, or AUR
    • Shadow a radiologist in the reading room to get a feel for the specialty
  2. What common variations exist in the length/content of residency programs for this career?
    Categorical residency programs are almost universally 4 years and require a preceding internship. Some residency programs may offer research tracks or allow clinical focus in a specific subspecialty
  3. What common variations exist in this career after training?
    Trainees typically complete a fellowship after residency in a radiologic subspecialty of their choice. Fellowships last one to two years (most are one).  Examples include: cardiopulmonary, abdominal, neuro, pediatrics, nuclear medicine, interventional radiology, musculoskeletal. After fellowship, the three most common practice settings are: academics, private practice, or night hawk (remote reading from a centralized locale, which is less common than the other two).  Some people focus on only a small subfield of radiology, some remain generalists, and some focus on procedures. There are a variety of ways to practice depending on what niche you find most appealing.
  4. What is a typical work day for someone in this field?
    Typical work hours are 8am to 5pm. However, radiology services are offered 24 hours a day in many centers. Call schedules vary widely based on the type of practice environment one chooses.
  5. What is the culture of this career?
    Radiologists are often calm and relaxed, given the relatively controlled practice setting. Particularly in busier subfields and in many private practice settings, the work load does require a great deal of attention and intensity. Radiologists tend to be respectful towards one another, and there is an overall acknowledgement of the importance of a work life balance.
  6. How compatible is this career with raising a family? How is this different for men and women?
    A career in radiology is very compatible with raising a family. One benefit is that the job is essentially shift work, so hours are predictable and regular.
  7. What are the most important qualities or character traits for a person in this field?
    Academic curiosity, problem solving ability, ability to focus when multiple distractions may be present
  8. How competitive are the residency programs in this field?
    Very competitive
  9. How competitive is the job market after residency?
    This is geographically dependent and can change dramatically every few years
  10. What programs have been popular among UCSF applicants, or how should applicants go about considering programs?
    There are a huge number and range of programs across the country. Come see us to discuss your best options when it is time to formulate an application list.
  11. What resources (eg, websites, books, professional groups) would you recommend for students interested in learning more about this field?
    • RSNA 
    • ARRS
    • AUR
    • Aunt Minnie (medical student forums are available, but take the information you read here with a grain of salt!)
  12. How important are each of the following for admission to a competitive program?
 

Very Important

Somewhat Important

Not Important

Comments

Extracurricular/
Volunteer Work

 

x

 

 

Research/Publications

x

 

 

 

Honors in Third Year

x

 

 

 

AOA

 

x

 

 

Subinternship

 

x

 

 

Externship

 

 

x

 

Other: USMLE Step 1

x      
Other: Radiology Electives/Interest x      
Emergency Medicine

Contact Emergency Medicine Advisors


CONFIDENTIAL

 


Statistics on UCSF students in 2018-19 who were matched into Emergency Medicine residency programs:

POST-MATCH REPORT  

  1. What can students do in the 1st and 2nd years to explore and/or prepare for this career? 
    UCSF medical students can engage in several opportunities to explore and prepare for a career in Emergency Medicine:
    • Take the Introduction to Emergency Medicine elective
    • Take the Wilderness Medicine elective
    • Join the Emergency Medicine Interest Group (EMIG)
    • Attend the Emergency Medicine lecture series (organized by EMIG)
    • Attend the UCSF Annual Disaster Conference (organized by EMIG)
    • Shadow an Emergency Medicine physician at UCSF or SFGH
    • Set up meetings with one or more of the Department of Emergency Medicine advisors (both faculty and residents)
  2. What common variations exist in the length/content of residency programs for this career?
    Three variations exist in residency programs. There are three-year Emergency Medicine residency programs (PGY 1-3) and four-year Emergency Medicine programs (PGY 1-4 and preliminary year + PGY 2-4). The PGY 1-4 residency training programs have their four-year curriculum at one Emergency Medicine residency program. The PGY 2-4 residency training programs have their three-year curriculum at one residency program preceded by an ACGME approved preliminary internship year.
  3. What common variations exist in this career after training?
    There are many! Most graduates from an Emergency Medicine (EM) residency program work as a general EM physician, though a good number undergo fellowship training for subspecialization, including EMS and disaster medicine, toxicology, pediatric EM, ultrasound, critical care, hyperbaric medicine, sports medicine, and more. The majority of graduates work in a community emergency department setting. Others enter academics and practice in an emergency department affiliated with an academic EM department, and engage in research, global health efforts, and/or administration. There are also settings where graduates practice in a community practice emergency department that has an affiliation with an EM residency training program; in this setting, one has the opportunity to engage in the clinical training of EM residents.
  4. What is a typical work day for someone in this field?
    Every shift is different (and this is an understatement)! While on shift, EM physicians provide care for multiple patients, determining which patients need emergent or urgent resuscitation, interventions, procedures, or transfer. Whether it is a pediatric, surgical subspecialty, neurologic, or obstetric patients, EM physicians provide care for all that come into the emergency department. EM physicians also engage with consultants from other departments when specialty care is indicated on an urgent basis or when hospital admission is warranted. EM physicians work shifts that range from 6-12 hours, though the majority of shifts in practice are 8 hours p;us time to signout and finish clinical tasks. EM physicians work closely with a team of nurses, medical assistants, and social workers. They may work alongside other EM physicians, but do not usually care for the same patients simultaneously.
  5. What is the culture of this career?
    EM physicians have a diverse range of interests and personalities. Even so, EM physicians are comfortable with a team-based approach to patient care, working closely with nurses, pre-hospital providers, and medical staff as equals. Cohesive camaraderie is an appealing part of this specialty. Dedication to patient well-being is another common theme for this specialty.
  6. How compatible is this career with raising a family? How is this different for men and women?
    A career in Emergency Medicine is compatible with raising a family, for both men and women. The defined shift work makes scheduling fairly predictable in order to spend time for family life obligations. Shifts may be requested or traded between colleagues to offer further schedule flexibility. However, most EM physicians should expect to work a mix of day, evening, night, weekend, and holiday shifts. The majority of EM physicians do not carry a pager, so time at home can be dedicated to family life. The possible exception is being on-call. This means if a colleague is unable to work a shift, the on-call physician either needs to work that shift or arrange for another physician to work that shift.  At some work environments, EM physicians are able to work additional shifts to earn more income to meet financial goals for their family. 
  7. What are the most important qualities or character traits for a person in this field?
    Emergency Medicine physicians are a diverse group of individuals. However, there are aspects of our clinical work that attract people with certain general qualities. Each clinical shift, EM physicians work closely with team members (EM nursing, medical assistants, clerks, social workers) as well as pre-hospital personnel (EMT, firemen, policemen), consultants, and admitting physicians. Thus, EM physicians are comfortable and effective working in teams and engaging in various types of interpersonal interactions. EM physicians see all types of patients and with various severity of disease. Thus, EM physicians have a broad knowledge base and are comfortable seeing a sick child, an elderly stroke patient, a pregnant patient with abdominal pain, or a patient with acute vision loss. While EM physicians are specialists of emergency care and may have a niche, EM physicians are comfortable involving specialty consultants to advocate for a patient’s care when a presentation or disease process is beyond their level of expertise. EM physicians are also comfortable with some degree of uncertainty and decisive decision making. Patients present with symptom complaints and the disease process at hand is not established. Many times, EM physicians must act with very little information and/or time to determine if there is a limb-threatening or life-threatening condition.
  8. How competitive are the residency programs in this field?
    Emergency Medicine residency programs are becoming increasingly more competitive. This field is more popular than in the past, leading to a robust number of applicants each year. There are generally very few positions to “scramble” into each year.
  9. How competitive is the job market after residency? 
    The job market is dependent upon location, with desirable cities being more competitive for jobs.
  10. What programs have been popular among UCSF applicants, or how should applicants go about considering programs?
    One of the most important aspects of an Emergency Medicine residency training program is fit. Where one trainee may thrive, another may struggle depending upon location, family obligations, curriculum, and relationships with colleagues and faculty. While this list is certainly not inclusive of all top tier programs and is in no particular order, commonly well-regarded EM training programs include UCSF, Alameda County (Highland), Stanford, USC, UCLA programs, NYU-Bellvue, Boston Medical Center, Harvard, Denver Health, Carolinas Medical, Vanderbilt, Emory, and Duke.
  11. What resources (eg, websites, books, professional groups) would you recommend for students interested in learning more about this field?
  12. How important are each of the following for admission to a competitive program?
 

Very Important

Somewhat Important

Not Important

Comments

Extracurricular/
Volunteer Work

 

x

 

Extracurricular and volunteer work can be important to competitive programs, but programs may also look for significant scholarly contributions

Research/Publications

 

x

 

Scholarly work can be important to competitive programs, but programs may also look for significant leadership or service contributions

Honors in Third Year

x

 

 

 

AOA

 

x

 

 

Subinternship

x

 

 

 

Externship

x

 

 

In general, applicants complete two EM clerkships

Other: Board scores

  x  

Failure or very low board scores will make admission more challenging to competitive programs

Family Medicine

Contact Family Medicine Advisors


NON-CONFIDENTIAL

 

 

 


Statistics on UCSF students in 2018-19 who were matched into Family Medicine residency programs:

POST-MATCH REPORT   

  1. What can students do in the 1st and 2nd years to explore and/or prepare for this career?
    • Participate in the Family Medicine Interest Group (FMIG).
    • Apply to the Primary Care Leadership Academy (PCLA).
    • Request a selective placement in a Family Medicine clinic.
    • Identify a Family Medicine mentor in the first year.
    • Participate in DFCM electives.
    • Contact Roy Johnston for details
  2. What common variations exist in the length/content of residency programs for this career?
    Family Medicine residencies are 3 years to be board eligible. Some programs have changed to 4 years, with the possibility of additional training in specific areas. There are some combined programs. Family Medicine-OB/GYN-4 years and Family Medicine-Psych-4 or 5 years.             
  3. What common variations exist in this career after training?
    There are numerous possibilities and variations after training. Full scope Family Medicine includes prenatal care and deliveries, and continuity care for patients throughout the life cycle. Nationally, about one third of Family Physicians practice obstetrics. Other Family Physicians practice primary care for the entire family, by providing caring for parents, children and grandparents; however, they may collaborate with colleagues in obstetrics who will deliver babies. After the delivery, Family Physician will then care for the new baby and mother as well as the rest of the family. Some Family Physicians choose to work in hospitals and provide inpatient care, but others do not. What unites the practice of Family Medicine is that nearly all Family Physicians spend at least some of their time providing primary care in a continuity setting.

    Post-residency fellowships or Certificate of Added Qualifications (CAQ) are available in: Adolescent Medicine, Sports Medicine, Geriatrics, Research, Obstetrics, Research, Public Policy, Health Advocacy, Complementary-Alternative Medicine, and Medical Education.

    Because of the breadth of training, Family Medicine is a highly desired specialty for global health and also for rural settings. Family Medicine is the only specialty for which Doctors without Borders will only give long-term placements abroad.

    It is not necessary to complete a fellowship to start clinical practice. Most FM clinicians do not complete sub-specialty fellowships.
  4. What is a typical workday for someone in this field?
    This is highly variable and dependent on the career path one chooses.  Practicing FM clinicians work primarily in outpatient settings, primarily in groups or larger health care organizations (e.g. Kaiser Permanente). Some Family Physicians work as hospitalists. Others work in Women’s Health setting (family planning, gynecology or abortion services). Others work in Sports Medicine practices.
    Family Physicians also work in emergency rooms, hospitals, rehabilitation facilities, nursing homes, and other inpatient and chronic care settings.
    Family Physicians interested in teaching can include precepting medical students and residents in their clinical practice.
    Family Physicians may combine research, education, public health, health policy and advocacy with part-time clinical practice.
  5. What is the culture of this career?
    The culture of Family Medicine is patient-centered, focused on continuity of care, and congruent with the primary care medical home (PCMH). Long-term relationships with patients and families are the foundation of Family Medicine. There is a strong orientation toward preventive care and public health. Many Family Physicians are engaged in local or national health reform efforts that focus on providing effective, efficient and cost- effective care that meets the needs of the national population. Many Family Physicians also place a high value on providing care for diverse patient populations, including medially underserved patients.
  6. How compatible is this career with raising a family? How is this different for men and women?
    Family Medicine is very compatible with raising a family.   In recent years, the majority of graduates entering family medicine are women.  Job sharing and less than full time work is available for both men and women. Due to the specialty’s commitment to maintaining physician and family well being, and also because of the high demand for primary care physicians, Family Physicians are in an excellent position to shape their jobs to work with family needs.
  7. What are the most important qualities or character traits for a person in this field?
    Important qualities for Family Physicians include comfort with broad-spectrum care; skills in collaboration, communication and flexibility; and the ability to work on multi-disciplinary teams.
  8. How competitive are the residency programs in this field? 
    UCSF graduates are recognized as excellent applicants for residency and are often highly recruited by residency programs throughout the country. In recent years, with the increased interest in primary care, family medicine residency programs have become more competitive.

    There are many types of family medicine residency programs in a variety of settings and with different missions.  There are community programs without other training programs (“unopposed” or “solo”), academic medical centers with a full range of other residency programs, rural programs and urban underserved programs. There are also residency programs at institutions with other residency programs (“opposed” or “collaborative” programs)
  9. How competitive is the job market after residency?
    With the increased interest in primary care and Family Medicine as the foundations of medical care, there is a demand for more Family Physicians and primary care physicians throughout the country. Salaries for Family Physicians, although less than sub-specialists, are increasing. There are loan re-payment programs available in Family Medicine.
  10. What programs have been popular among UCSF applicants, or how should applicants go about considering programs?
    Because there are a variety of programs within different settings and foci, applicants should initially identify their long-term interests and goals, and then explore programs that fit those interests and goals.

    Popular programs for UCFS students include all the Bay Area programs including the UCSF Family Medicine residency program at SFGH, Santa Rosa Family Medicine Residency, Contra Costa Regional Medical Center, San Jose O’Connor Hospital, and Kaiser Permaente Napa-Solano in Vallejo.  In addition to other California programs, our graduates have been drawn to many areas around the country, including Seattle, Boston, and New York.

    Students considering applying in Family Medicine should meet with Dr. Margo Vener during summer of their 4th year to help develop their list of potential programs to apply to.
  11. What resources (eg, websites, books, professional groups) would you recommend for students interested in learning more about this field?
    National Meetings:
    AAFP National Conference of Residents and Students – in Kansas City in late July/early August. It is an excellent meeting--geared to students and residents; great presentations at their level and interests; good opportunity to see how important FM is in the rest of the world. Also, at least 50% of the ~425 FM residency programs have booths at the meeting so students can save money residency trip travel by talking to programs at the meeting. Great networking and information. There are scholarships available.

    Society of Teachers of Family Medicine Medical Student Education Conference – Late January, for students interested in academic FM, scholarships available. We strongly encourage you to submit abstracts.

    Society of Teachers of Family Medicine Annual Conference – April or May, very large attendance, but not specifically geared to students.

    SNMA and NMA - the local NMA group contact here is Sinkler Miller in Oakland.

    Online Resources:
    • AAFP FMIG website​​​​​​
    • AAFP – Strolling Through the Match
    • AAFP info about what the discipline is doing to address global health concerns

      Family Medicine Organizations:
      American Board of Family Medicine The ABFP is the medical specialty board responsible for the establishment of high standards of excellence in the specialty of Family Medicine and for the design and administration of the family medicine specialty certification examination.

      American Academy of Family Physicians: The AAFP is a national medical association of family physicians, family medicine residents and medical students whose purpose is to promote and maintain high quality standards among family physicians and to provide advocacy on behalf of patients and the profession.  Our state chapter is the California Academy of Family Physicians.

      Society of Teachers of Family Medicine: STFM is an academic family medicine organization that strives "to enhance family medicine education by developing and supporting a community of educators, scholars and clinicians."

      North American Primary Care Research Group: NAPCRG is a multidisciplinary organization that fosters the development of primary care research.

      Collaborative Family HealthCare Coalition: The CFHcC is a multi-disciplinary group of health care professionals who study, implement and advocate for the collaborative family health care paradigm.

      World Organization of Family Doctors: A worldwide partnership of family medicine organizations.

      Loan Repayment & Scholarships:
      California: The California Physician and Dental Corps is a loan repayment program for doctors and dentists designed to increase health and dental care access in the underserved populations of California. Some sites in the Bay Area qualify for this. The program offers loan forgiveness to participating primary care doctors and dentists in exchange for a 3-year service commitment after residency in a medically underserved area of the state.

      Indian Health Service Loan Repayment

      National Health Services Corps: The National Health Services Corps (NHSC) recruits and places health professionals at eligible sites within federally designated HPSAs. NHSC recruits primary care physicians who serve in community-based systems of care in return for scholarship or loan repayment assistance.

      Pisacano Scholarship: Applications are available for entering fourth year U.S. medical students who have declared Family Medicine as their specialty. The Pisacano Scholars Leadership Program will provide education programs, leadership training and funding over a four-year period to award recipients. Funds are intended to reduce medical-school debt and are not based on financial need. Applicants are judged on their commitment to Family Medicine, leadership qualities, academic performance, and involvement in helping others. www.pisacano.org Deadline: Late February - early March each year.

      General scholarship information is available from FedMoney.org

      Financial Assistance Fund for UCSF medical students matching at a UCSF Family Medicine Residency Program Dr. C.E. Wells Alumni Assistance Fund in Family and Community Medicine: http://www.familymedicine.medschool.ucsf.edu/education/residency_prog.aspx
       
  12. How important is each the following for admission to a competitive program?
     

    Very Important

    Somewhat Important

    Not Important

    Extracurricular/
    volunteer work

    x

     

     

    Research/publications

     

     

    x

    Honors in third year

    x

     

     

    AOA

     

    x

     

    Subinternship

    x

     

     

    Externship

     

    x

     

Interventional Radiology

Contact Interventional Radiology Advisors


NON-CONFIDENTIAL

 

 

CONFIDENTIAL

 


  1.  What can students do in the 1st and 2nd years to explore and/or prepare for this career?
  • Step 1 scores are important, particularly at top programs! Study hard!
  • Take the IR elective course (winter quarter)
  • Join the Interventional Radiology Interest Group (IRIG)
  • Join the Society of Interventional Radiology – there is a Resident/Fellow/Student section
  • Attend the annual SIR meeting – there is a scholarship for 1st and 2nd year medical students (deadline typically October)
  • Get involved in a research project early
  • Shadow an interventional radiologist in the angiographic suite
  1. What common variations exist in the length/content of residency programs for this career?
  • The training pathway algorithm is currently in flux
  • Previously, a career in IR was achieved by doing a 1 year internship, then a 4 year diagnostic radiology (DR) residency, then a 1 year IR fellowship
  • As of 2016, a direct pathway IR residency has been established
  • Once this change has been instituted, there will be 3 routes to a career in IR
    • Integrated IR residency
      • This option represents the direct pathway – NRMP match during 4th year of med school
      • 1 internship year, then 5 year residency (3 years of diagnostic imaging training followed by 2 years of procedural/clinical service training)
    • Independent IR residency
      • Similar to old training pathway – apply at end of diagnostic radiology residency
      • 1 internship year, 4 year DR residency, 2 year Independent IR residency
    • Early specialization in IR (ESIR)
      • Some programs will allow transfer from a diagnostic radiology residency into IR residency
      • Specific IR dominant curriculum in the fourth year of the DR residency
      • Shortens the Independent IR residency to 1 additional year instead of 2
  1. What common variations exist in this career after training?

There are many options for types of jobs for Interventional Radiologists. The main decision is between an academic job and private practice job. Academic jobs in IR are usually 100% IR based out a tertiary care hospital and involve components of teaching, research and institutional service. Private practice jobs are more variable in terms of the ratio of IR to DR. A typical private practice job might involve 2 or 3 days per week of performing IR procedures and 2 or 3 days per week of interpreting diagnostic scans.
 

  1. What is a typical workday for someone in this field?

The workday begins with rounding on patients that we are following or that had procedures the day before. Next, images and clinical information on patients that are scheduled to have procedures that day are reviewed. Procedures are performed in angiography suites, on the CT scanner or in an ultrasound room. Consults are fielded throughout the day. There is typically a mix of scheduled outpatient procedures and inpatient add-ons with emergent cases usually related to active bleeding.  
 

  1. What is the culture of this career?

IR is similar to surgical sub-specialties with a tilt toward diagnostic radiology imaging guidance. Work hours are typically longer compared to diagnostic radiology colleagues.
 

  1. How compatible is this career with raising a family? How is this different for men and women?

Raising a family is not a problem. Several faculty members in our section have young children. One potential issue to consider is radiation exposure to women that become pregnant.
 

  1. What are the most important qualities or character traits for a person in this field?

IRs tend to be hard working, conscientious, thoughtful and need to have a grasp on every field in medicine. Creativity and innovation are essential as it is not unusual to come across a problem not seen before.
 

  1. How competitive are the residency programs in this field?

We expect the new integrated programs to be very competitive.
 

  1. How competitive is the job market after residency?

The job market for all types of radiologists has picked up in the last couple years after about 4 or 5 years of relative job scarcity.

 

  1. What programs have been popular among UCSF applicants, or how should applicants go about considering programs?

Since this is a new residency, we do not have data to answer this question yet.
 

  1. What resources (eg, websites, books, professional groups) would you recommend for students interested in learning more about this field?

Society of Interventional Radiology
 

  1. How important is each the following for admission to a competitive program (please indicate with “X”)?

 

 

Very important

Somewhat important

Not important

Comments

Extracurriculars/ volunteer work

 

x

 

Can be useful for discussion point during interviews

Research/ publications

x

 

 

This is the main way to really distinguish yourself from other applicants

Honors in third year

x

 

 

Surgery honors is most important

AOA

 

x

 

 

Sub-internship

 

x

 

 

Externship

 

x

 

Doing an IR elective month where you want to match can either help or hurt you depending on how you represent yourself

Boards scores

x

 

 

 

Letters of rec

 

x

 

Choose carefully – a wishy washy letter can hurt you

Other:

 

 

 

 

Laboratory Medicine
  1. What can students do in the 1st and 2nd years to explore and/or prepare for this career?
    Identify mentor (in research if applicable). Focus on mechanisms of disease, hematology, infectious disease, and endocrinology issues.
  2. What common variations exist in the length/content of residency programs for this career?
    Single certification in Clinical Pathology  (Laboratory Medicine): 36 months required – 24 months for rotations needed in hematology, transfusion medicine, microbiology, chemistry, molecular medicine, immunology and lab management and 12 months of flexible training or research.
    Double certification in Anatomic and Clinical Pathology:18 months of the clinical pathology rotations, 18 months of anatomic pathology and 12 months of flexible training or research.
  3. What common variations exist in this career after training?
    Academia with specialization clinically in transfusion medicine, hematology, chemistry, micro biology, immunology, or molecular medicine; teaching; laboratory management, with or without research. Private practice (commercial clinical labs). Private practice pathology (requires anatomic pathology [surgical pathology]). Biotech.
  4. What is a typical workday for someone in this career?
    Overseeing lab quality control, consulting with clinicians, investigating new tests, signing out test results (e.g. bone marrow), teaching residents, ensuring compliance with laboratory regulatory agencies, research
  5. What is the culture of this career?
    Generation of information for clinical use. Development of new diagnostic tests. Critical analysis of medical literature. General scientific inquiry. Research.
  6. How compatible is this with raising a family? How is this different for men and women?
    Very compatible for both sexes
  7. What are the most important quality or characteristic traits for a person in this field?
    Interest in quantitation, analytics, mechanisms of disease, clinical consultation and research.
  8. How competitive are the residency programs in this field?
    Not competitive nationally
  9. How competitive is the job market after residency?
    Job market favorable
  10. What programs have been popular within the UCSF applicants or how should applicants go about considering programs?
    UCSF, Stanford, Washington U ( St. Louis), Yale, Harvard (MGH, Brigham and Women’s). Visit the programs.
  11. What resources (e.g., websites, books, professional groups) would you recommend for students interested in learning more about this field?
    UCSF Pathology and Laboratory Medicine website: http://pathology.ucsf.edu
    Pocket Guide to Diagnostic Tests, Lange, Nicoll et al 6th edition
    American Society of Clinical Pathology website: www.ascp.org
    College of American Pathologists website: www.cap.org
    Intersociety Council of Pathology Information website: www.pathologytraining.org
  12. How important are each of the following for admission to a competitive program?

 

 

Very Important

Somewhat Important

Not Important

Extracurricular/
volunteer work

 

 

x

Research/publications

x

 

 

Honors in third year

 

x

 

AOA

 

x

 

Subinternship

 

 

x

Externship

 

 

x

 

Medicine

Contact Medicine Advisors


NON-CONFIDENTIAL

Categorical/Primary Care

Preliminary/Transitional 

 


Statistics on UCSF students in 2018-19 who were matched into Medicine residency programs:

POST-MATCH REPORT 

  1. What can students do in the 1st and 2nd years to explore and/or prepare for this career? 
    Participate in the Internal Medicine Interest Group and through noon presentations.

  2. What common variations exist in the length/content of residency programs for this career?
    IM residency is 3 years. There are traditional categorical programs, which are inpatient based. Categorical residents usually pursue subspecialty fellowships afterward (e.g., cardiology, infectious disease), but can also become hospitalists or primary care physicians. Primary care residency programs are also 3 years, but incorporate more clinic time and small group seminar teaching.
  3. What common variations exist in this career after training?
    Endless! Subspecialty practice, hospitalist, primary care doctor, clinician-scientist, clinical researcher, outcomes researcher, health policy, international health, medical education.
  4. What is a typical work day for someone in this field?
    Varied! Clinically, internists may work predominantly in the inpatient or outpatient settings. Many internists combine clinical practice with leadership, research, or educational work.
  5. What is the culture of this career?
    Diverse interests, interested in the whole patient, motivated to teach and learn, enjoys problem solving and analysis.
  6. How compatible is this career with raising a family? How is this different for men and women?
    Wealth of options for part time or full time work make it potentially very compatible with the rest of your life.
  7. What are the most important qualities or character traits for a person in this field?
    Commitment to patients, critical thinker, strong work ethic - to be thorough and careful. Enjoy teamwork.
  8. How competitive are the residency programs in this field?
    UCSF students match extremely well in IM - at the top programs in the country. UCSF students are highly sought by residency programs.
  9. How competitive is the job market after residency? 
    There are many jobs for internists, particularly for hospitalists and primary care physicians.
  10. What programs have been popular among UCSF applicants, or how should applicants go about considering programs?
    The most commonly selected IM residencies by UCSF students in recent years are: UCSF (categorical and primary care), Brigham and Women's Hospital, Massachusetts General Hospital, UCLA, Stanford.
  11. What resources (eg, websites, books, professional groups) would you recommend for students interested in learning more about this field?
    American Medical Association: http://www.ama-assn.org/ama/pub/category/14.html
    American College of Physicians: http://www.acponline.org/medical_students
    UCSF Internal Medicine Residency: http://medicine.ucsf.edu/housestaff/
  12. How important are each of the following for admission to a competitive program?
 

Very Important

Somewhat Important

Not Important

Comments

Extracurricular/
volunteer work

 

x

 

 

Research/publications

 

x

 

 

Honors in third year

x

 

 

Including Summary Evaluation comments in the MSPE

AOA

 

x

 

 

Subinternship

x

 

 

Just the required IM subI at UCSF; no need to do away subinternships

Externship

 

 

x

 

Other: Core clerkship grades in other specialties

x      
Med-Peds (Combined Internal Medicine & Pediatrics Programs)

Contact Med-Peds Advisors


CONFIDENTIAL

 

 

 


Statistics on UCSF students in 2018-19 who were matched into Med-Peds (Combined Internal Medicine & Pediatrics Programs) residency programs:

POST-MATCH REPORT 

  1. What can students do in the 1st and 2nd years to explore and/or prepare for this career?
    I would first stress that it is important to not feel pressured to make a decision too soon. There are always students who change their minds many times through medical school, and some need to take time after completing medical school to figure this out. I would suggest paying close attention to interest groups and attending gatherings to get to know more about the culture and lifestyle of different physicians in different fields. There are plenty of informal get-togethers with residents present – they may serve as your best resources to get the nitty-gritty of training. Shadow Med Peds physicians when possible (don't be shy!) to learn about their perspectives and to get an idea of daily life. Be wary of those who are critical of any particular training program or fields of practice, without having a true understanding of what they entail.

  2. What common variations exist in length/content of residency programs for this career?
    All Medicine/Pediatrics programs are four years in length. They vary with respect to intervals at which residents switch back and forth between medicine and pediatrics, though most have a four month block (this can vary from 3-6 months, however). Because you are meeting requirements to sit for boards in BOTH specialties, you have a limited time to do so in four years. This makes the variability amongst programs less than in categorical programs. The amount of elective time is largely truncated in all programs because of the time-crunch, but there are some institutions with a more creative approach to classifying "elective" time that can allow you latitude in international travel or other endeavors.

  3. What common variations exist in this career after training?
    There are SEVERAL. Roughly half of residents graduating in the past few years have entered primary care--in medicine/pediatrics, family practice, internal medicine, or pediatrics clinics. Several graduates (~33%) have subspecialized in one area or the other (pediatrics or adult medicine) and some enter new fellowships which train in their given subspecialty in BOTH fields. Some areas particularly akin to this unique training include global health, longitudinal care of patients with pediatric illnesses (e.g., adult congenital heart disease, cystic fibrosis, IBD, rheumatologic diseases), and work in health policy. Other possible areas for your career include hospitalist medicine in the community and teaching/academic medicine. Contrary to what many believe, most med/peds trained doctors still care for both adults and children -- and those who do not, continue to value the training they received!

  4. What is a typical work day for someone in this field?
    One of the exciting aspects of Med Peds is that there is no such thing as a typical workday. As mentioned above, the opportunities to carve out your own career path are practically limitless.

  5. What is the culture of this career?
    Med Peds attracts very diverse, independent, adaptable, and bright young doctors. There is a stereotypical intellectuality inherent in the world of Medicine and playfulness inherent in the world of Pediatrics – Med Peds providers tend to embrace both of these worlds. In actuality, both Medicine and Pediatrics cultures vary from institution-to-institution and coast-to-coast. You will find that while Med Peds possesses aspects of both categorical medicine and pediatrics cultures, there is also a very unique Med Peds flavor nationwide. This is difficult to appreciate here in the Northwest US, where there is currently a void of Med Peds training programs. Nontheless, there is a growing cadre of Med Peds fellows and attendings here at UCSF, and ample opportunity to explore this culture via away electives at other institutions.

  6. How compatible is this career with raising a family? How is this different for men and women?
    No matter what career you choose, this is always a consideration to keep in mind. Med Peds training offers a broad skill set that can help people to define their own unique career paths – some of which may be more demanding than others. Potential career options include hospital vs clinic-based, primary vs subspecialty care, academic vs private practice. All of these options bring unique rewards and challenges – and some may indeed provide more time for being home with the family. Of note, UCSF is a largely family-friendly institution and many people have carved out careers in special ways to suit their home needs.

  7. What are the most important qualities or character traits for a person in this field?
    Adaptability, independence. There are many times when you feel 'out of the loop' with respect to your categorical colleagues, and need to fall back on some internal strength to get through residency and know all will equalize on the other end of training.

  8. How competitive are the residency programs in this field?
    In general, students who desire a career in Med Peds are able to match in a residency training program. It is important to note, however, that the most “coveted” programs nationally can be quite competitive, particularly in light of the small number of residents accepted to each program.

  9. How competitive is the job market after residency?
    Given the breadth of the possibilities for your career, job opportunities are plentiful.

  10. What programs have been popular among UCSF applicants, or how should applicants go about considering programs?
    Programs are really clustered on the East Coast and in the Mid-West. Well-known and highly thought of programs (in both categorical and med/peds) include the two Harvard programs (MGH, BWH), Hopkins, UNC-CH, Penn, Duke, Michigan, Yale, Brown, Baylor and UCLA. Lesser-known from a categorical perspective, but highly thought of from a med/peds perspective include: Rochester, Baystate, Case-Western, U Chicago and UCSD.

  11. What resources (eg, websites, books, professional groups) would you recommend for students interested in learning more about this field?
    http://www.medpeds.org/
    http://www2.aap.org/sections/med-peds/

  12. How important are each of the following for admission to a competitive program?

     

    Very Important

    Somewhat Important

    Not Important

    Comments

    Extracurricular/
    volunteer work

    x

     

     

     

    Research/publications

     

    x

     

     

    Honors in third year

    x

     

     

     

    AOA

     

    x

     

     

    Subinternship

    x

     

     

     

    Externship

     

     

    x

     

Neurological Surgery

Contact Neurological Surgery Advisors


NON-CONFIDENTIAL

 

 

CONFIDENTIAL

 

 


Statistics on UCSF students in 2018-19 who were matched into Neurological Surgery residency programs:

POST-MATCH REPORT   


Neurology

Contact Neurology Advisors


NON-CONFIDENTIAL

 

 

CONFIDENTIAL

 

 


Statistics on UCSF students in 2018-19 who were matched into Neurology residency programs:

POST-MATCH REPORT   

GENERAL INFORMATION ABOUT A CAREER IN NEUROLOGY

  • What are some common variations in career path in this specialty?

As with most medical specialties, careers in neurology can focus on clinical practice, research, education, global health. Some neurologists begin practicing after graduating from residency, while many others elect to pursue a fellowship for subspecialty training (e.g. in epilepsy, neuromuscular, or cognitive neurology).

  • What is a typical workday like?

This will vary widely depending on specific career choices, but for a general neurologist the majority of one’s practice is in the outpatient setting. Neurologists see a mixture of younger patients (with conditions such as migraine headaches and multiple sclerosis) and older patients (with conditions such as stroke and dementia). There is also a mix of patients with chronic conditions who are followed for years (e.g. myasthenia gravis or epilepsy) and patients with temporary conditions who are followed for only a short period (e.g. carpal tunnel syndrome or lumbar radiculopathy).

  • What is the culture of this specialty?

The culture of neurology is, of course, defined in large part by the type of individuals who are attracted to the field. Neurologists tend to be motivated (rather than disillusioned) with the fact that there is a tremendous amount that we do not know about the functions of the nervous system. They see the care of patients with neurological illness as a great mixture of compassion, careful observation and intellectualism, and don’t mind the fact that the work is not heavily procedure based (although neurologists usually decide which procedures are needed).

  • What are the ways in which this career path may support or challenge having a family?

Neurology is a family-friendly career. Many residents at UCSF–both men and women–have had children during residency.

  • What are the ways in which this specialty encourages and supports inclusiveness anddiversity? 

Neurology has made tremendous efforts toward supporting and encouraging inclusiveness and diversity. The UCSF Department of Neurology established a Diversity committee in January 2014 to improve department diversity, and also strongly encourages all faculty to undergo Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Champion training. The American Academy of Neurology recently established a leadership program to develop and promote leaders that reflect the diverse background of its members and the patients they serve.

  • What are the most important qualities or character traits for a person in this field?

Intellectual curiosity, patience, some level of comfort with ambiguity, an intense interest in the patient’s story, and fascination with the nervous system.

HOW CAN STUDENTS BEST EXPLORE AND PREPARE TO PURSUE A CAREER IN NEUROLOGY

  • What can students do during F1 to explore and/or prepare for this career?

The first-year neuroscience course–Brain, Movement and Behavior–offers lots of opportunities to meet neurologists and get an idea of the world of neurology. In addition to the apprenticeships that are part of BMB (and which involve direct patient interactions), you should feel free to ask the course faculty about opportunities to go on ward and consult rounds, and shadow clinicians in the outpatient setting. (Of course, you can do this anytime, not just during BMB). Many students who are interested in neuroscience also seek out a research fellowship during the summer between first and second year.

  • Planning considerations for F2?

Neurology aims to provide students on the core clerkship with a meaningful experience from which to evaluate the field as a potential career choice. To supplement the largely inpatient adult neurology core clerkship experience, several Clinical Immersion Experiences also are available, including multiple experiences in both outpatient neurology and in pediatric neurology.

  • Planning considerations for Career Launch?

Students pursuing a career in neurology should complete a neurology sub-internship prior to September, in order to allow timely completion of Letters of Recommendation as well as grades in time for MSPE release.

  • What resources (e.g., websites, books, professional groups) would you recommend for students interested in learning more about this field?

Check out the activities of the UCSF Brain Interest Group (BIG). There are also useful resources at the American Academy of Neurology’s website, and that of the American Neurological Association.

  • How competitive are the residency programs in this specialty?

Not very–essentially all UCSF graduates get into one of the first-tier programs in the country. That said, a few programs are competitive and nearly every applicant from UCSF will get into one of their top 3 choices.

  • When should students contact the specialty advisor? The confidential advisor?

In order to receive a spot in a Neurology sub-internship, students must receive permission from Clerkship Director Megan Richie ([email protected]), who is also one of the confidential career advisors in neurology. She will help make sure you are scheduled for a sub-I that meets your career planning needs. The other confidential career advisor is Daniel Lowenstein ([email protected]).

  • How important is each the following for admission to a competitive program?
 

Very Important

Somewhat Important

Not Important

Comments

Extracurricular leadership efforts

 

X

   

Research/publications

 

X

   

Honors in F2*

 

X

 

Honors in some courses are preferable, but not specific ones

AOA

   

X

 

Honors in Sub-I

X

     

Externship

   

X

 

USMLE Step 1 and 2 Scores

 

X

   

Top Tier Medical School

 

X

   

Community Service

 

X

   

*F2 Honors grades only relevant to Class of 2020 (or students who did F2 before fall 2018)

  • How can students best find mentors?

Confidential career advisors Daniel Lowenstein and Megan Richie would be happy to provide recommendations for mentors students might consider in research opportunities. A complete list of faculty member profiles is found on the UCSF Department of Neurology website.

  • How can students evaluate their chances of matching?

Most UCSF graduates get into one of the first-tier programs in the country. That said, a few programs are competitive, although nearly every applicant from UCSF still gets into one of the top 3 choices on their rank list. To ensure a successful match, students should meet with Megan Richie in order to assist in the interview and rank list preparation process.

  • How competitive is the job market after residency?

Jobs are widely available. Although desirable urban areas with a high cost of living (e.g. Boston, San Francisco, New York) may have more competitive job markets, neurology residents graduating from UCSF and Stanford in recent years have been very successful finding jobs in the Bay Area at Kaiser and other community practices.

RESIDENCY APPLICATION IN NEUROLOGY

  • How many letters of recommendation are required and from which types of specialties?

Students submit a maximum of 4 letters of recommendation, one of which comes from the neurology sub-internship. If a student has done significant research, one should also be a research letter. The remaining letters should be clinical letters from attendings in any specialty; the most important factor is that the letter writer should know the student well.

  • Does the department write a letter of recommendation for the student?

No, although the letter from the neurology sub-internship often will incorporate language from multiple attendings.

  • Advice on writing personal statements?

Clerkship director Megan Richie would be happy to review personal statements if that is helpful to those students applying in neurology.

  • How many programs do students typically apply to?

Most students apply to 10-18 programs and interview for 8-10. Talk with career advisor Megan Richie for personalized advice regarding number of applications and interviews.

  • What types of variations in training programs are there (e.g., different tracks, different lengths)?

Neurology residency is typically 4 years long: 1 year of internal medicine (internship) and 3 years of neurology (residency). Some programs accept students into internship and residency at the same time; others only accept students into residency and they have to find a separate internship. Some programs have specialized tracks in research, education, global health, etc.

  • What programs have been popular among UCSF applicants, or how should applicants go about considering programs?

We are happy to discuss this question in person.

  • Is this Match through the NRMP or another matching service?

The Match is through the NRMP.

  • What are important topics or themes to include in a personal statement?

A personal statement in neurology should be organized and well written; at minimum it will be used as an example of the student’s writing ability. Ideally, the personal statement will also contain a cohesive narrative that illustrates one or more distinctive characteristics of the student’s application.

  • When are residency applications due?

Match registration opens on September 15th. Because top programs can fill their interview spots quickly, applicants are encouraged to submit their application on September 15th or not long thereafter, in order to optimally position them for early interview requests and allow them to coordinate their interview schedules efficiently and optimally. The final deadline for Match registration is November 30th.

  • How can applicants best prepare for interviews?

Read about each program ahead of time and prepare several questions in advance. Review the interview schedule and consider looking up each interviewer briefly in case there are personalized questions to consider asking. The UCSF Office of Career & Professional Development (OCPD) offers interview preparation resources if students are interested, though this is not an essential element to performing well on neurology interviews.

  • What is the etiquette for contact with residency programs after interviews have been completed?

Sending an email to the residency coordinators after the interview is a nice gesture, and some students elect to email their individual interviewers as well. However, this is by no means an expectation and students who do not write these emails are not tracked, nor penalized. Some students will also email their first-choice program to indicate their first choice-preference. Finally, if students have additional questions about programs it is certainly acceptable to seek those answers after the interview. Students should not reach out to programs regarding program rank lists.

  • How many programs do students typically rank?

Students typically rank a similar or the same number of programs at which they interviewed, usually 8-10 as above.

Obstetrics & Gynecology

Contact Obstetrics & Gynecology Advisors



Statistics on UCSF students in 2018-19 who were matched into Obstetrics & Gynecology residency programs:

POST-MATCH REPORT   

  1. What can students do in the 1st and 2nd years to explore and/or prepare for this career? 
    During your first year, enroll in the one or more of the following electives, U-Teach, Surgical Assist, Reproductive Health, Introduction to Ob-Gyn Clinical Skills, African-American Health Disparities (includes a lot of obgyn), Health Workshops at the San Francisco Jail, Ob-Gyn Global Health Issues. Also enroll in the Homeless Clinic elective and then come to the Sunday evening Women’s Clinic to work with our attendings and residents, attend the ob-gyn career dinners  twice a year (see email invites from Julie Lindow) where you get to know ob-gyns who practice in the community,  attend the seminar about research opportunities for ob-gyn for the summer following the first year of medical school, visit with an ob-gyn career advisor even if you are not 100% sure about ob-gyn. 

    Second-year students should consider becoming an elective student coordinator for one of the courses listed above.
  2. What common variations exist in the length/content of residency programs for this career?
    All ob-gyn residencies are 4 years in length. The first year is 6 months of ob-gyn and 6 months of medicine (geriatrics, ER, ward, etc) and then the last three years are all ob-gyn. Elective time varies from 0 to 3 months depending on the residency. The second year is all ob-gyn, the third year usually has the elective time if there is any, and the fourth year, all residents serve as Chief Residents and lead teams in ob-gyn. There are residency programs at academic centers as well as community hospitals.
  3. What common variations exist in this career after training?
    There are formal three-year fellowships in maternal-fetal medicine, gyn oncology, reproductive endocrinology. Occasionally at some fellowship, gyn oncology is four years. There are variable-length residencies in uro-gynecology, family planning, minimally invasive surgery, global health, and reproductive infectious diseases. There are also opportunities to do other fellowships like preventive health, hematology, epidemiology, palliative care, etc.

    Most residency graduates go into practice after training, either at Kaiser, community practices, or private practice. However, some graduates are hospital-based such as laborists, ob-gyns who decide to devote the next part of their career to women having babies. Some residency graduates do international health, either full-time or part-time. Some enter academic medicine as generalists, or having done a fellowship. The opportunities are limitless.
  4. What is a typical work day for someone in this field?
    There is no typical work day: it depends on where you practice. For instance, at a Kaiser, you might have 6 clinic sessions per week, a day in the operating room, 1-2 nights on call a month for extra $$, and ½ day per week for education. If you are in private practice, you might start by rounding on your hospital patients, go to the office to see patients, have call once a week or once or twice a month, operate one day per week. As an academic, you usually have a mix of clinic sessions, administrative meetings (head a clerkship or a residency), research, teaching. You can work part-time or full-time.
  5. What is the culture of this career?
    It is fast-paced, diverse, joyful to help families bring new life into their lives, hard when an outcome doesn’t happen that was anticipated, and longitudinal: usually you take care of your patients during a span of years and get to know them well. Also, you get to perform surgery.
  6. How compatible is this career with raising a family? How is this different for men and women?
    Depending on what you choose for your work environment, it can be compatible with raising children and having a strong relationship with a spouse. The current work conditions vary drastically from the old days when the number of hours worked per week were 100 – 120. Typically the work week for someone working full-time is 40 – 60 hours plus one to two nights of call per month. Many ob-gyns work 4 days per week, or sometimes half-time. The opportunities abound for both men and women. Sometimes for men, a patient panel will take a little longer to fill out at the beginning of one’s career, but research shows that the compassion and caring is more important to women choosing an ob-gyn than gender.
  7. What are the most important qualities or character traits for a person in this field?
    Strong interpersonal skills to work as a team and to communicate effectively and easily with patients; enjoyment of being in the OR or Labor and Delivery; ability to adapt to different environments quickly whether  at your office and then running to the L and D unit to delivery one of your long-term patients; energetic and enthusiastic.
  8. How competitive are the residency programs in this field?
    University residency programs are competitive. Community residency programs are less competitive. Get career counseling early in the field if you  have low Step 1 scores or did not pass Step 1 on your first attempt.
  9. How competitive is the job market after residency?
    here is a shortage of ob-gyns nationally so there are many job opportunities.
  10. What programs have been popular among UCSF applicants, or how should applicants go about considering programs?
    Talk to an ob-gyn career advisor individually about this fit of programs for you.
  11. What resources (eg, websites, books, professional groups) would you recommend for students interested in learning more about this field?
    Become a Junior Fellow in the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. At their annual meeting, there is a wonderful panel on residency matching, as well as an essay contest that if you win, you have free ride to the meeting! Also, look at the Associate of Professors in Ob-Gyn (APGO) website.
  12. How important are each of the following for admission to a competitive program?
 

Very Important

Somewhat Important

Not Important

Comments

Extracurricular/
volunteer work

x

 

 

 

Research/publications

 

x

 

 

Honors in third year

 

x

 

 

AOA

 

 

x

Not necessary but of course helpful

Subinternship

x

 

 

 

Externship

 

 

x

May be helpful, ask Dr. Robertson

Ophthalmology

Contact Ophthalmology Advisors


NON-CONFIDENTIAL

 

 

 

CONFIDENTIAL

 

 

 


Statistics on UCSF students in 2018-19 who were matched into Ophthalmology residency programs:

POST-MATCH REPORT   

  1. What can students do in the 1st and 2nd years to explore and/or prepare for this career?
    Explore Ophthalmology as a career choice by participating in the 160.01 noon-time Introduction to Ophthalmology elective in the fall. This is a great overview of the different subspecialities and opportunities in ophthalmology. Consider participating in a research project in ophthalmology or vision science during the summer between first and second year; this can provide you with a career mentor as well as an opportunity to explore a question in ophthalmology in depth, and perhaps may lead to an abstract or publication in the field. Study hard during the core curriculum and perform well on the USMLE Step 1; this is often used by residency programs as a metric to determine which candidates will be invited for interviews.

  2. What common variations exist in the length/content of residency programs for this career? 
    Ophthalmology residency programs consist of one year of internship, which is usually a transitional internal medicine year, followed by three years Ophthalmology residency.

  3. What common variations exist in this career after training?
    Most people who complete their residency training go on to pursue fellowship training in Ophthalmology sub-specialties including: Cornea/Refractive Surgery (1 year); Pediatric Ophthalmology (1 year); Glaucoma (1 year); Retina (2 years); Ophthalmic Plastic Surgery (2 years); Less commonly: Ocular oncology, Neuro-ophthalmology, Ophthalmic Pathology (all 1 year each).

  4. What is a typical work day for someone in this field? 
    The typical work week for a private practice Ophthalmologist is two days in the O.R. and three days in the office. An academic clinician scientist will likely spend 2.5 days in the lab and 2.5 days in the clinical arena. 10 hour days are fairly typical.

  5. What is the culture of this career?
    Ophthalmologists are procedure oriented and are interested in devices and equipment to a high degree. Ophthalmologists are very interested in developing innovations in treatments and diagnostic approaches compared to some other surgical fields.

  6. How compatible is this career with raising a family? How is this different for men and women?
    A career in Ophthalmology is compatible with raising a family to the extent that any surgical career is compatible with this goal. In general, about 50% of practice is in the outpatient clinic and about 50% is in the OR. The surgeries are nearly always done on an out-patient basis and inpatient call and coverage is much less than for some other surgical fields.

  7. What are the most important qualities or character traits for a person in this field?
    Ophthalmologists tend to be specialists who enjoy understanding a topic in great depth. Microsurgery requires meticulous attention to detail and excellent dexterity. Compassion for patients experiencing vision problems is very important, and passion to improve our ability to treat vision-threatening diseases is important as well.

  8. How competitive are the residency programs in this field? 
    Ophthalmology is one of the most competitive residency application processes in the U.S. Our program at UCSF receives about 450 applications for five positions. However, 75% of U.S. seniors who complete the match process will match.

  9. How competitive is the job market after residency?
    The job market in ophthalmology is competitive in markets like San Francisco, so it is important to complete a sub-specialty fellowship after residency training.

  10. What programs have been popular among UCSF applicants, or how should applicants go about considering programs?
    This is an ever-evolving list, and the top 10 programs as listed by US News and World Report may or may not be the best match for every applicant. Many excellent programs include: UCSF, Johns Hopkins Wilmer Eye Institute, Bascom Palmer Eye Institute at University of Miami, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Jules Stein Eye Institute at UCLA, Duke, Emory, Wills Eye Institute, Washington University, Casey Eye Institute at Oregon Health and Science University, University of Washington, University of Michigan, University of Pennsylvania, Stanford, Columbia, UCSD, CPMC, University of Utah. Also, programs can change rapidly, so this is a moving target.

  11. What resources (eg, websites, books, professional groups) would you recommend for students interested in learning more about this field?
    Check out the Vision and Ophthalmology Interest Group website for lots of helpful information: https://sites.google.com/site/ucsfpreophthalmology
    American Academy of Ophthalmology: http://www.aao.org/about/eyemds.cfm
    The Ophthalmology Match is facilitated by SFMatch.org: http://www.sfmatch.org

  12. How important, individually, are each the following for admission to a competitive program:
     

     

    Very Important

    Somewhat Important

    Not Important

    Comments

    Extracurricular/
    volunteer work

     

    x

     

     

    Research/publications

    x

     

     

     

    Honors in third year

    x

     

     

     

    AOA

     

    x

     

    This helps a tremendous amount, but lots of people match who are not AOA members

    Subinternship

    x

     

     

     

    Externship

     

     

    x

     

    Other

          USMLE scores are frequently used as a screening tool in determining who will be interviewed, and therefore who will be accepted. Letters of recommendation are extremely important, so it is essential to find a career mentor who knows you well and can write a strong letter on your behalf. Often a research experience can provide you not only with exposure to an unsolved question in the field, but also a career mentor and ideally some contribution to our state of knowledge that you can discuss during interviews (ideally resulting in an abstract, presentation, or publication if possible). The interview is extremely important and provides you with a chance to demonstrate your passion for ophthalmology. Your career goals may be important depending upon the program you are visiting and you should ideally apply to programs that have strengths that are compatible with your career goals.
Orthopaedic Surgery

Contact Orthopaedic Surgery


CONFIDENTIAL

 

 

 


Statistics on UCSF students in 2018-19 who were matched into Orthopaedic residency programs:

POST-MATCH REPORT   

What can students do in the 1st and 2nd years to explore and/or prepare for this career? 

Students have various opportunities to explore a career in orthopaedics:

160.01 Introduction to Clinical Orthopaedics, winter quarter

Students get hands on experience and will learn to recognize the presentation of musculoskeletal conditions; understand how to evaluate a patient with a musculoskeletal condition, including directed physical examination, and manage the patient with a musculoskeletal condition at a level appropriate for their skill set. A Musculoskeletal examination practicum is given at the end of the six sessions.

160.04 Orthopaedic Surgical Skills and OR Assist

Medical students will have the opportunity to learn about orthopaedic surgical skills and techniques — suturing, plating a long bone fracture, using a bone saw, etc. — and assist ortho faculty in the operating room and clinic. Students will attend one surgical skills labs where they will learn how to use orthopaedic surgical instruments and repair a long-bone fracture. Students will also be able to develop mentoring relationships with orthopaedic faculty through the OR Assist Mentor Match.

Other opportunities for 1st and 2nd year students:

  • Shadow a resident at ZSFG Hospital and trauma center when they are on call overnight and see how fractures and other orthopaedic injuries are acutely managed. Sign up for the Orthopedic Surgery Interest Group to get on the newsletter.
  • Noon lectures by faculty in the fall and spring
  • Partner with our orthopaedic faculty on research projects in the summer between 1st and 2nd years 
  • Attend the annual medical student meeting with the Dr. Vail (chairman) and Faculty Advisors
  • Attend an information session by ortho residents who were prior UC medical students
  • Resident mentors available for students interested in orthopaedics
  • Volunteer for Playsafe Cardiac Physicals  
  • Attend weekly morning conference and grand rounds, beginning at 6:30am most days.   

     For more information, contact Daniel Peterson

2. What common variations exist in the length/content of residency programs for this career? 

Most orthopædic programs are five years in length: intern year (6 months general surgery, 6 months ortho), 4 years rotating between the 8 principal (trauma, arthroplasty, sports, pediatrics, hand, foot and ankle, spine, and oncology) divisions of orthopædic surgery. Some programs add a 6th research year that is often completed between the 3rd and 4th year of residency. Most fellowships programs are 1 year in length. 

3. What common variations exist in this career after training? 

  • Private practice and academic medicine. This is a busy surgical field.
  • Part time is possible though rare. Most groups require full time call. 

4. What is a typical work-day for someone in this field?

  • At work before 7:00 am, though may vary depending on practice.
  • Home by 7:00 pm, though varies.
  • The days of the week are divided equally between clinic and operating room. 
  • Number of call days for an attending surgeon vary according to institution, but can be as frequently as 10 days per month or as infrequently as 2 weeks per year.
  • Residents work the full 80 hours per week and take call 1-3 days per week. 

5. What is the culture of this career? 

  • Extrovert, energetic, caring, up-tempo, innovative, and optimistic.
  • Traditionally a male-dominated field: < 7% of all practicing orthopædic surgeons are female, however this is changing.  This is an opportunity for impact for women. At UCSF, approximately 30% of the residency program and 28% of the faculty are comprised of women. Trauma care is integral to the culture: immediacy, unpredictability.  This is a less controlled field like some other surgical subspecialities such as ophthalmology. 

6. How compatible is this career with raising a family? How is this different for men and women?

Both male and female surgeons have families. In general, a surgical career requires a more organized and planned approach to managing family.  This can include in-home care (i.e. Live-in nannies) or family support with child-rearing. Women in surgery are more likely to postpone starting a family until residency is finished although there have been women who opt to start a family during their training. This may mean a shorter maternity leave, using vacation time, and/or additional training time to complete all the ACGME requirements to graduate.           

7. What are the most important qualities or character traits for a person in this field? 

Hard work and being a team player are the two most consistently valued traits in orthopaedics. Other important traits and qualities include: sensitivity towards patients and others, (flexibility, sense of calmness (operating room can be very fast paced and stressful), humility and dedication.

8. How competitive are the residency programs in this field? 

This is one of the most competitive fields, in the same group as neurosurgery, dermatology and plastic surgery. 

9. How competitive is the job market after residency?

It is very competitive because the quality of student who enters the field is high. Also, the job market varies amongst specialties. Hand Surgery and Sports Medicine are most competitive now. Because of the aging population, orthopaedic surgeons will have job security for the next couple of decades.
The population is aging, and technology is driving expansion of the field. 

10. What programs have been popular among UCSF applicants, or how should applicants go about considering programs?

Doing away rotations are critical to the application, but can be a double-edged sword. While they usually increase the chance of matching at that program because they may be regarded as a month-long interview, they occasionally harm the student if they do not perform well. It is expected that students complete at least two away rotations in addition to your home rotation.

UCSF students are popular at Columbia, Harvard, UC Davis, University of Washington, Duke, Stanford, and Hospital for Special Surgery. Other sites prior UCSF students have rotated at include Northwestern, UCSD, NYU, and UCLA
Several factors influence decision to rotate at an away program: When you rotate at a program, you also need to ask yourself: “Would you be happy ending up at that program/location/etc?”

  • Location.  Will you enjoy living there?  Note that surgeons settle a mean of ~ 60 miles from where they train, showing that strong connections are formed during residency and fellowship.
  • Large or small program?  The former may offer a more diverse experience, while the latter may be more intimate.
  • Private or academic?  As general rules with exceptions, private programs tend to be more gentile, more primarily operative (e.g. less fellows), less intellectually rigorous.
  • Do you have an early interest?  E.g. a broad county public trauma experience or a highly specialized more private training?
  • How is the resident culture?  Are the residents cohesive and happy?
  • How is the faculty culture?  Is there turnover?  Is the Chair position stable?
  • How is the operative experience?  E.g. do fellows constitute a barrier?
  • How is the formal education curriculum?  E.g. conference schedule, funding for academic travel.
  • What are there research opportunities?  E.g. research rotation, publications with attending faculty, extra year or other time for research training.
  • Where do graduates take fellowships?

 
11. What resources (eg, websites, books, professional groups) would you recommend for students interested in learning more about this field? 

  • Start at https://www.aamc.org/cim/
  • Check the Orthopædic Surgery Interest Group (OSIG) at UCSF
  • Contact the department for available resources (faculty and residents)
  • Check the Orthobullets website as you begin to shadow more

12. How important is each the following for admission to a competitive program?

 

 

Very Important

Somewhat Important

Not Important

Comments

Extracurricular/
volunteer work

 

x

 

 

Research/publications

x

 

 

Does not have to be in orthopædics: excellence is most important.  However, in orthopædics is more understandable to potential interviewers and offers an opportunity to discuss and impress.

Honors in third year

x

 

 

These are the best correlates with success in residency and therefore important. Honors in surgery and medicine is strongly recommended.

AOA

 

x

 

 

Subinternship

x

 

 

Essential for recommendation. Hard work and dedication are key. Read for every case. Demonstrate initiative.

Externship

x

 

 

Specific to externship. For example, letter of recommendation from an externship may not be important beyond that program.

Other: USMLE Step 1
 

x

 

 

Many programs screen out applicants < 225.

Other: Longitudinal Clinical Experience   x  

A source of second orthopædic letter of recommendation from a varied setting.

An opportunity to learn more about the field.

Otolaryngology

Contact Otolaryngology Advisors


CONFIDENTIAL

 

 


Statistics on UCSF students in 2018-19 who were matched into Otolaryngology residency programs:

POST-MATCH REPORT   

  1. What can students do in the 1st and 2nd years to explore and/or prepare for this career? 
    Excellent performance in the basic science curriculum and demonstration of mastery of the material on the USMLE Step 1 are of paramount importance. A publishable project in the field is desirable and most programs highly value a commitment to research. Shadowing practicing otolaryngologists who practice in different aspects of the specialty can aid in getting exposure to the field.
  2. What common variations exist in the length/content of residency programs for this career?
    The vast majority of programs consist of one year of Otolaryngology/Head and Neck Surgery – supervised general surgery internship, followed by four years of Otolaryngology/Head and Neck Surgery training, culminating in the Chief Residency year. Some programs require two years of general surgery; some have a 7-year research track (Hopkins); some require mandatory research and extra time (University of Washington).
  3. What common variations exist in this career after training?
    Most people who complete their training go on to practice otolaryngology. Some do fellowships as follows:
    Facial Plastic Surgery (1 year)
    Pediatric Otolaryngology (1 or 2 years)
    Otology/Neurotology (2 years)
    Head and Neck Oncologic Surgery (1 or 2 years)
    Rhinology/Sinus Surgery (1 year)
    Laryngology (1 year)
    Sleep Medicine (1 year)
    Allergy (1 year)
    Skull Base (1 year)
  4. What is a typical work day for someone in this field?
    The typical work week for a private practice otolaryngologist is two days in the OR and three days in the office. An academic clinician scientist will likely spend 2.5 days doing research (either in the lab or clinical). Ten hour days are fairly typical.
  5. What is the culture of this career?
    Nice folks, happy, well‐adjusted. Otolaryngologists are procedure oriented and are interested in devices and equipment to a high degree. They are often more open to innovations compared to some other surgical fields. Otolaryngologists often enjoy the balance between clinic and surgery and the ability to have continuity in care of their patients.
  6. How compatible is this career with raising a family? How is this different for men and women?
    A career in Otolaryngology/Head and Neck Surgery is compatible with raising a family. Balancing a family and professional life is challenging in most areas of medicine. Of the surgical disciplines, otolaryngology is more family friendly than some fields. There are excellent male and female role models on our field who excel in their professional endeavors while raising a family.
    The number of women applying in the field increases every year. Currently, the field is approximately 70% male and 30% female. This is the same ratio as the application pool applying to residency.
  7. What are the most important qualities or character traits for a person in this field?
    Dedication to the field and enthusiasm are important traits. Attention to detail and clinical excellence are prized.
  8. How competitive are the residency programs in this field?
    Otolaryngology is one of the more competitive residency application processes in the U.S. Our program at UCSF receives about 250 applications for three positions. However, 75% of U.S. seniors who complete the match process will be placed.
  9. How competitive is the job market after residency? 
    The job market in this field is excellent. About 280 new otolaryngologists are produced each year and the attrition from death and retirement is approximately the same. There are about 9000 otolaryngologists in the U.S.
  10. What programs have been popular among UCSF applicants, or how should applicants go about considering programs?
    First Tier: Hopkins, Pittsburgh, Penn, Michigan, Washington University, University of Washington, UCSF, UCLA, Ohio State, Iowa, Harvard, Chapel Hill, Vanderbilt, Stanford
    Second Tier: Cincinnati, Virginia, OHSU, UCSD, Utah, Columbia, Cornell, Sinai, UCD, Loyola, Northwestern, MUSC
    Third Tier: Boston University, USC, UIC, New Mexico, University of Vermont, Henry Ford, St. Louis University, Louisville, Miami, Missouri at Columbia, other Texas programs, Nebraska, Wayne State, Penn State, Jefferson, Georgetown, Louisiana State University
    Please note: This is a personal assessment. There is no "bad" Otolaryngology/Head and Neck Surgery program. Also, programs can change rapidly, so this is a moving target.
  11. What resources (eg, websites, books, professional groups) would you recommend for students interested in learning more about this field?
    Individual departmental websites
    http://www.otomatch.com
    http://entnet.org
    Pub Med to do literature searches on people who you meet in the field
  12. How important are each of the following for admission to a competitive program?
 

Very Important

Somewhat Important

Not Important

Comments

Extracurricular/
volunteer work

 

x

 

 

Research/publications

x

 

 

 

Honors in third year

x

 

 

 

AOA

x

 

 

 

Subinternship

x

 

 

 

Externship

 

x

 

 

Other: Performance on  Step 1 of the USMLE

x      
Pathology

Contact Pathology Advisors


NON-CONFIDENTIAL

 

CONFIDENTIAL

 

 


Statistics on UCSF students in 2018-19 who were matched into Pathology residency programs:

POST-MATCH REPORT 


Pediatrics

Contact Pediatrics Advisors


NON-CONFIDENTIAL

 

 

CONFIDENTIAL

 

 


Statistics on UCSF students in 2018-19 who were matched into Pediatrics residency programs:

POST-MATCH REPORT

 GENERAL INFORMATION ABOUT A CAREER IN PEDIATRICS

  • What are some common variations in career path in this specialty?
    • There are so many variations within pediatrics. Some are generalists and others are subspecialists. Some pediatricians are clinical (outpatient or inpatient), some are research oriented, and others do a variety of things including advocacy, medical education, quality improvement and systems science, hospital leadership etc. The sky really is the limit–whatever inspires you!
  • What is a typical workday like?
    • Completely depends on your career path.
  • What is the culture of this specialty?
    • Passion for helping children and families.
  • What are the ways in which this career path may support or challenge having a family?
    • Since pediatricians work with families every day, the career is usually very supportive of physicians having a family, and in general the field supports having appropriate work/life balance.
  • What are the ways in which this specialty encourages and supports inclusiveness anddiversity?
    • There are lots of initiatives within the department of pediatrics to support DEI. One clear example is the Peds Diversity Committee, which is a resident-lead group that is committed to increasing diversity in the department. They do a lot of applicant outreach and try to recruit students who are underrepresented in medicine.
  • What are the most important qualities or character traits for a person in this field?
    • You must love working with children and families!

 HOW CAN STUDENTS BEST EXPLORE AND PREPARE TO PURSUE A CAREER IN PEDIATRICS

  • What can students do during F1 to explore and/or prepare for this career?
    • Come to the Peds SIG (Special Interest Group) elective “Exploring Pediatrics” where you can hear about a variety of topics, including perspectives from UCSF pediatric speakers (specialists, generalists, interprofessionals.). It is held in the fall of the F1 year, August through December.
    • The Peds career advisors will hold sessions during early Arch weeks 1 and/or 2.
    • There is also a Peds Mixer that happens in May of every year, with students, residents, fellows and faculty in pediatrics, to allow you to meet other folks in pediatrics and hear about their experiences. It’s a casual evening that will allow you to talk about pediatrics in a relaxed setting.
    • You can also meet with advisors in pediatrics at any time for an individual meeting.
  • Planning considerations for F2?
    • The Peds career advisors will hold sessions during Arch weeks 6.
    • There is also a Peds Mixer that happens in May of every year, with students, residents, fellows and faculty in pediatrics, to allow you to meet other folks in pediatrics and hear about their experience. It’s a casual evening that will allow you to talk about pediatrics in a relaxed setting.
    • You can also meet with advisors in pediatrics at any time for an individual meeting.
  • Planning considerations for Career Launch?
    • We hold a deep-dive planning session usually in March.
    • In April during Arch week 7, we hold office hours where you can meet with an advisor in a one-on-one setting.
    • There is also a Peds Mixer that happens in May of every year, with students, residents, fellows and faculty in pediatrics, to allow you to meet other folks in pediatrics and hear about their experience. It’s a casual evening that will allow you to talk about pediatrics in a relaxed setting.
    • During the summer, we are available to review your CV, personal statement, and talk through where you are applying.
    • The career advisors will be writing your Peds Departmental Letter.
    • We hold an evening for interview preparation in October.
    • You can meet with advisors in Pediatrics at any time for an individual consult.
  • What resources (e.g., websites, books, professional groups) would you recommend for students interested in learning more about this field?
  • How competitive are the residency programs in this specialty?
    • As with many specialties, top-tier residencies are very competitive, and others are considered in the “safety-school” category. In general, UCSF students do very well matching into Pediatrics.
  • When should students contact the specialty advisor? The confidential advisor?
  • How important is each the following for admission to a competitive program?
 

Very Important

Somewhat Important

Not Important

Comments

Extracurricular leadership efforts

x

x

 

Depends on depth of involvement

Research/publications

   

x

Some value, depends on program

Honors in F2*

x

     

AOA

 

x

   

Honors in Sub-I

x

     

Externship

   

x

 

USMLE Step 1 and 2 Scores

x

     

Top Tier Medical School

 

x

   

Community Service

x

x

   

*F2 Honors grades only relevant to Class of 2020 (or students who did F2 before fall 2018)

Additionally, a few of the most important admission considerations include:

  • Interview interactions
  • Interpersonal skills
  • Professionalism and ethics
  • Leadership skills
  • Perceived commitment to pediatrics
  • See Ryan MS Acad Peds, 2015, using NRMP PD Data, 2013
  • How can students best find mentors?
    • Ask around, starting with their career advisors!
    • Ask around to identify a near-peer/senior student/new resident in pediatrics for specific questions.
    • Engage with peers from the Pediatric SIG to help navigate process of applications from the student/applicant perspective.
  • How can students evaluate their chances of matching?
    • The match really is about taking the entire application together. Many students are weak in one area and superstars in others. Your career launch advisor (Michele or Sabrina) will help you put together a rank list that is appropriate for your application.
  • How competitive is the job market after residency?
    • UCSF graduates tend to do very well.

RESIDENCY APPLICATION IN PEDIATRICS

  • How many letters of recommendation are required and from which types of specialties?
    • 4 letters, including one pediatric departmental letter
  • Does the department write a letter of recommendation for the student?
    • Yes
  • Advice on writing personal statements?
    • Keep it simple and personal. It’s OK to get emotional. We will send many more personal statement tips for you in the summer/fall of your career launch year.
  • How many programs do students typically apply to?
    • Between 8-15 typically, but more if couples matching or dual applying.
  • What types of variations in training programs are there (e.g., different tracks, different lengths)?
    • Some residencies have “fast track” programs for students who are bound for subspecialty. For example, UCSF Peds Residency has many students who complete 2 years in pediatrics training and then move on to fellowship in Pediatric HemeOnc or Child Neurology, or other specialties.
    • Some students apply in MedPeds programs if they are also interested in adult medicine.
    • Some students pursuing pediatric anesthesia and/or pain and/or palliative care may do so through varying residencies: pediatric residency, anesthesia, other (depends on career goals)
  • What programs have been popular among UCSF applicants, or how should applicants go about considering programs?
    • Geography is often a key driver for residency program consideration. Many residency programs are in larger urban/suburban areas, as children’s hospitals are often affiliated with larger universities. Many students are interested in West Coast programs because they are used to living on this side of the country. But there is a big variety.
  • Is this Match through the NRMP or another matching service?
    • Yes, through NRMP.
  • What are important topics or themes to include in a personal statement?
    • You must articulate in your personal statement that you love working with kids!
    • Highlight experiences/events that shaped your understanding of pediatrics/career plan, experiences that reflect leadership/engagement.
  • When are residency applications due?
    • Mid-September.
  • How can applicants best prepare for interviews?
    • Come to our interview prep night in October. We will go over a typical interview day and give you tips on how to prepare. You will also hear from a panel of Peds interns who were just in your shoes the year before.
  • What is the etiquette for contact with residency programs after interviews have been completed?
    • It’s appropriate to send a thank you note to any interviewer who you were especially drawn to.
  • How many programs do students typically rank?
    • 8-15 depending on their application.
Pediatric Neurology

Contact Pediatric Neurology Advisors


NON-CONFIDENTIAL

 

CONFIDENTIAL

 

 

 


Statistics on UCSF students in 2018-19 who were matched into Pediatric Neurology residency programs:

POST-MATCH REPORT 

Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation

Contact Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation Advisors


CONFIDENTIAL

 

 


Statistics on UCSF students in 2018-19 who were matched into Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation residency programs:

POST-MATCH REPORT 

  1. What can students do in the 1st and 2nd years to explore and/or prepare for this career?
    Briefly, PM&R specialists (aka Physiatrists) provide comprehensive care for patients with medical conditions resulting in loss of function or ability to perform self-care or day-to-day tasks (both vocational and avocational). Physiatrists provide patients with a medical rehabilitation plan of care with the goals of improving patient function and preventing complications or deterioration secondary to disabling conditions.

    1st and 2nd year students should consider contacting any of the UCSF PM&R faculty in either the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery or Pediatrics to learn more about the specialty. 

    Additional information can be found on the American Academy of PM&R website specifically for medical students: http://www.aapmr.org/career/students/Pages/default.aspx. In recent years, the Academy has offered a Medical Student Program during their annual assembly designed to provide information about pursuing a career in PM&R.  These courses have been free of charge.

    If students are very interested in the field, they may rotate as 3rd or 4th year students on the Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Clinical Clerkship 140.08.
     
  2. What common variations exist in the length/content of residency programs for this career?
    There are approximately 77 ACGME accredited PM&R programs across 28 states. The majority of PM&R training programs are 3 years in length after completion of an intern year. Approximately 28 programs offer a four-year program that includes the intern year.

    The PGY-1 year should provide training in fundamental clinical skills. This can either be in an accredited transitional year program (most common choice) or at least six months accredited training in family medicine, pediatrics, surgery or a combination of these patient care experiences. The remaining six months may include accredited training in a combination of specialties or subspecialties.

    All training programs include inpatient and outpatient experiences in PM&R. Training includes, but is not limited to, care of patients with: musculoskeletal disorders, acute and chronic pain, neuropathies, neuromuscular disease, central nervous system disorders, cardiovascular disease, traumatic brain injury, spinal cord injury, amputations, polytrauma, arthroplasties, sports injuries, rheumatologic disorders, medical deconditioning, burns and wounds.  All programs include training in electrodiagnostics (electromyography and nerve conduction studies). 

    There are also options for combined Pediatrics/PM&R programs that are five years in length total. Interested students can contact the UCSF pediatric physiatry faculty about these paths if they have a particular interest in pediatric rehabilitation.
     
  3. What common variations exist in this career after training?
    Many residents pursue fellowship training after completion of residencies. Many fellowships are ACGME accredited. Fellowship opportunities include, but are not limited to: Pediatric Rehabilitation, Brain Injury Medicine, Spinal Cord Injury Medicine, Neuromuscular Medicine, Sports Medicine, Pain Medicine and Sports/Spine Medicine.

    Many residents proceed straight into clinical practice following residency. Whether an individual goes into practice after residency or completes a fellowship, there are a variety of clinical settings where PM&R can be practiced. The scope of PM&R training affords individuals with a high degree of flexibility when choosing a practice setting.  A physiatrist may practice in a purely inpatient (e.g. inpatient rehabilitation center) or purely outpatient setting or a combination of both. Other individuals may pursue careers in academic settings. Further, physiatrists may choose to specialize in the treatment of specific type of patients (e.g. patients with sports and spine disorders or patients who have sustained trauma). Given the trends in health care, many physiatrists join group practices (as opposed to a solo practitioner setting). Often, these groups are multi-specialty practices, consisting of orthopaedic and/or neurosurgical specialists.
     
  4. What is a typical work day for someone in this field?
    The typical work day of a physiatrist varies widely, depending on the type of practice setting (see #3). Outpatient practices may consist of seeing scheduled patients throughout the day. Those who practice interventional spine and joint injections may have days (or part of days) designated solely to procedures. Inpatient physiatrist schedules are less predictable. However, team conferences are a unique aspect of inpatient rehabilitation care and include a comprehensive team including the physiatrist, rehab nurses, physical therapists, occupational therapists, speech therapists, psychologists, social workers, and case manager. They are a staple for inpatient physiatrists as these times are designated to coordinate care for, often, complex patients. 
     
  5. What is the culture of this career?
    The practice of PM&R is truly a team sport. Physiatrists have been “brought up” in a culture of learning to lead and work effectively in interdisciplinary teams with focus on patient-centered care, long before this model of care was universally adopted. As such, the specialty attracts individuals who work and communicate well with their peers, colleagues, patients, and caregiver/families. Physiatrists develop a unique bond with patients and their families, often helping them through some of their most difficult days and often following them long-term. In addition to the medical aspects of care, physiatrists are focused on function and developing an individualized plan for patients to return to their regular lives.
     
  6. How compatible is this career with raising a family? How is this different for men and women?
    PM&R as a career is very compatible with raising a family. Call schedules vary, depending on the practice setting. In general, as there are few “rehabilitation emergencies,” being on call may not be as demanding as other specialties. There is no significant difference for men and women in terms of raising a family.
     
  7. What are the most important qualities or character traits for a person in this field?
    As noted in #5, physiatrists need to be able to work well with their colleagues and to demonstrate excellent communication skills. Physiatrists need to be able to both attend to the details of a patient’s care and look comprehensively about a patient’s functional status as it relates not only to self-care, but also to overall functioning within the community. Physiatrists must be able to motivate patients to take an active role in their health care. In addition, physiatrists need to be excellent educators, not only for the patient and their caregivers, but also for the medical team caring for the patient. As with any other specialty, physiatrists must possess the drive for continual learning and honing of their skills to continue to evolve into a better clinician.
     
  8. How competitive are the residency programs in this field?
    As there are so few residency positions available, matching in the top programs can be competitive. Recently, there has been an increase in the number of PGY1 positions available in the match. In general, on average, nearly 100% of the positions offered in the match are filled.
     
  9. How competitive is the job market after residency?
    As with many other specialties, the job market can be competitive for those seeking to live in certain areas of the country that are thought to be desirable.  However, there are excellent job opportunities throughout the country for both inpatient and outpatient (and a combination of both!) physiatrists. As noted in #3, one of the unique aspects of this field is the wide spectrum of practice opportunities – inpatient/outpatient, academic/non-academic, solo/group.
     
  10. What programs have been popular among UCSF applicants, or how should applicants go about considering programs?
    There are many excellent PM&R residency programs. Information for most programs can be found on their respective websites. Recently, the American Academy of PM&R has been offering a Residency Fare during its Annual Assembly. Many residency programs are represented at the Fare by their residency directors and residents. Additional information can be found at the Academy’s website: http://www.aapmr.org/members/residents/Pages/default.aspx.

    UCSF students have traditionally sought programs on the west coast. Of note, there are only five PM&R programs in the state of California – UC-Davis, Stanford, UCLA, UC Irvine, and Loma Linda. Recent program matches have included: Stanford, UCLA, and the University of Washington. East coast matches have been to the Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital associated with Harvard University. UCSF faculty members can help put students in touch with attendings or residents of a variety of programs to help with program choices. It is highly recommended that students rotate to the program of their choice for a sub-internship, especially if the program is highly competitive.
     
  11. What resources (e.g., websites, books, professional groups) would you recommend for students interested in learning about this field?
    Please see the links noted in #1 and #10.
     
  12. How important are each of the following for admission to a competitive program?
      Very Important Somewhat Important Not Important Comments
    Extracurricular/
    volunteer work
    x      
    Research/publications   x   Certainly helpful
    Honors in third year x      
    AOA   x    
    Subinternship x      
    Externship x     Particuarly for competitive PM&R programs
Preventive Medicine

Contact Preventive Medicine Advisors


NON-CONFIDENTIAL

 

 


  1. What can students do in the 1st and 2nd years to explore and/or prepare for this career? Nothing in particular

  2. What common variations exist in the length/content of residency programs for this career?  
    The residency in general preventive medicine and public health is three years long: one clinical, one academic and one practical. There are at least three combined four-year internal medicine-preventive medicine programs, including UCSF’s combined program with Kaiser San Francisco. Many programs, however, run their preventive medicine residencies more like fellowships and want residents who have already completed primary residencies in family medicine, internal medicine, pediatrics, etc.

  3. What common variations exist in this career after training?  
    There are multiple career pathways. The primary route is governmental service at the federal, state or local (in California, county) level in public health agencies. Residents also find employment in managed care organizations (e.g., the Kaiser Division of Research) and industry and some return to clinical care.

  4. What is a typical work day for someone in this field?
    Ten hours with minimum patient contact. Primarily conducting investigations, analyzing and interpreting data and providing administrative supervision of non-medical staff.

  5. What is the culture of this career?
    It varies widely depending on where it is practiced. If the primary focus in international (like working for the World Health Organization) there will be a lot of political overlay – probably more so than at the federal, state or local levels. Practitioners tend to be pretty sophisticated about epidemiology, can interpret and generate evidence effectively and have good supervisory skills.

  6. How compatible is this career with raising a family? How is this different for men and women?
    Very compatible unless large amounts of international travel are required (a fairly small slice of the field)

  7. What are the most important qualities or character traits for a person in this field?
    Being thoughtful and analytical and being able to apply clinical knowledge to complex public health situations

  8. How competitive are the residency programs in this field?
    Not very competitive.

  9. How competitive is the job market after residency?
    Somewhat competitive depending on type of job.

  10. What programs have been popular among UCSF applicants, or how should applicants go about considering programs?
    Top tier would be Harvard, Emory, Hopkins, UCSF, maybe Oregon Health Sciences (which is a combined family medicine program) and Dartmouth.

  11. What resources (eg, websites, books, professional groups) would you recommend for students interested in learning more about this field?
    Look at the American College of Preventive Medicine’s website for greater understanding of the breadth of opportunities in the field: www.acpm.org.

  12. How important is each the following for admission to a competitive program?

 

Very Important

Somewhat Important

Not Important

Comments

Extracurricular/
volunteer work

 

 

X

 

Research/publications

X

 

 

 

Honors in third year

 

X

 

 

AOA

 

X

 

 

Subinternship

 

X

 

EPI 140.07

Externship

X

 

 

Externship at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Other

 

X

 

MPH at Berkeley between third and fourth years​​​​​​

Psychiatry

Contact Psychiatry Advisors


CONFIDENTIAL

 

 


Statistics on UCSF students in 2018-19 who were matched into Psychiatry residency programs:

POST-MATCH REPORT 

  1. What can students do in the 1st and 2nd years to explore and/or prepare for this career? 
    Consider being active in the UCSF Psychiatry Student Interest Group. Talk to any of the psychiatrists who are involved in the Essential Core curriculum (there are several). Learn more by joining national psychiatry organizations, such as the American Psychiatric Association (http://www.psychiatry.org/), or the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry (http://www.aacap.org/). A very useful informational website about psychiatry as a discipline is http://www.psychiatry.org/medical-students. See additional sites listed in #11 below.

  2. What common variations exist in the length/content of residency programs for this career? 
    Most psychiatry residencies are four years long. There are a few programs that accept residents in their PGY-2 year (e.g. after completing a separate internship), but the majority include the intern year as part of the initial application process.

  3. What common variations exist in this career after training? 
    The field is incredibly diverse, so there are a wide variety of ways to discuss “variations” in psychiatry. One axis is to consider location of practice (e.g. individual private practice, small groups, independent hospitals, large healthcare systems (e.g. Kaiser), and academic medical centers). Another axis is the location of patient care (e.g. inpatient, partial hospitalization, entirely outpatient). A third axis is the number of patients seen in any specific session (e.g. individual, couples, or groups). A fourth axis is the focus of treatment (e.g. psychotherapy, medication management, combination). Of course, there are also sub-specialties that require additional fellowship training after residency (i.e. child psychiatry, geriatrics, forensics, addiction, psychosomatic, public psychiatry, others). All of these axes can be combined in whatever ways individual psychiatrists find most fulfilling. It is also worth explicitly stating that there are psychiatrists who elect to work less than full-time, and/or work for more than one employer.

  4. What is a typical work day for someone in this field? 
    Typical very much depends on what variation(s) any given psychiatrist elects to pursue (see question #3 above). One psychiatrist might engage in a combination of outpatient medication management and psychotherapy patient visits all day, while another is an entirely inpatient psychiatrist. Another might be conducting laboratory or clinical research on the biologic basis of a particular disorder, while another psychiatrist is working in a psychiatric emergency facility. Though there are always exceptions, in general work days are reasonably stable with predictable hours.

  5. What is the culture of this career? 
    The culture of this career, although varied like any specialty, tends to be on the more laid back end of the spectrum. People do not tend to go into psychiatry as a means of achieving vast fame or fortune, but instead tend to see it as a calling. Inherent within psychiatric illnesses are often slow changes over time and along with this, longterm, intense relationships with patients, so psychiatrists tend to be patient and fairly relaxed. To be sure, psychiatry can be quite stressful, in particular if one chooses to work with more acutely ill patients. However, there are many choices of career path within psychiatry, so one can choose to be a part of a busy, acute inpatient unit or ER, or a more calm, predictable outpatient practice, for example, so to some degree one can determine a sub-culture for himself or herself.

  6. How compatible is this career with raising a family? How is this different for men and women?
    Psychiatry offers a great deal of flexibility in terms of career options, from very full time inpatient or consultation work plus private practice to part time private practice or ER work; one can truly construct a schedule as calm or as busy as one may like.

  7. What are the most important qualities or character traits for a person in this field? 
    As is perhaps obvious, being a patient, good listener is key, whether one is doing medication management or psychodynamic psychotherapy. Very much related to this, curiosity is quite important, whether one is in private practice or in a research setting; being genuinely interested in understanding your patients’ experiences is key to any doctor/patient relationship. Psychiatry is less exact a science than many fields, so one must be flexible and creative at times in treatment approaches.

  8. How competitive are the residency programs in this field? 
    Like most everything else, this varies depending on the location and size of the program. Applicants who are UCSF med students already start off very competitive because of our school's national reputation. If you have no blemishes on your record in the first two years and have done well in clinical rotations, you should go into the process feeling competitive anywhere in the country. Of course it helps to honor in clerkships and electives, particularly in psychiatry, but it is by no means a requirement. Programs know that our student body is incredibly competitive and that we don't grade inflate. Demonstrating leadership skills, passion for the work, and strong interpersonal skills are at least as important as grades for the most competitive programs. If you are definitely headed for a research career in psychiatry, that also scores lots of points.

  9. How competitive is the job market after residency? 
    This really depends on how picky you are—if you only want to do a highly specialized niche within psychiatry (like specializing in transcranial magnetic stimulation [TMS]), then you may need to very flexible about where you end up living. If your interests are more general, you will be in demand and will likely be able to live and work anywhere. A significant percentage of psychiatrists open up at least a part-time private practice, and depending on the market, those practices seem to thrive. Public sector psychiatry including city, county, federal, and forensic positions seem to always be available, even in otherwise saturated markets like the Bay Area.

  10. What programs have been popular among UCSF applicants, or how should applicants go about considering programs?
    This is a tough one. The good news is that there are many outstanding programs out there like UCSF, UCLA, MGH, and Columbia among many others. Programs vary quite a bit in terms of size, focus, depth of faculty, opportunities for continuity, and emphasis on biological vs psychotherapeutic interventions. The selection process for you is therefore unique to your interests and learning style. I would also emphasize the importance of location: psychiatry residency training is stressful, and being in a program where you feel you will be jive well with your classmates and supervisors and feel at home in the city is very important for thriving. Ask yourself if it is a program and a city where you would be able to do the things you need to do for self-care and relaxation, and are the people you'll be working with people you can relate to and enjoy.

  11. What resources (eg, websites, books, professional groups) would you recommend for students interested in learning more about this field? 
    The psychiatry training directors' organization (AADPRT) has a document titled "General Psychiatry Residency Application Process Guidelines" which is a helpful read for the application, interview, and match process. Their website (http://www.aadprt.org/) has a whole section for students and residents. The American Psychiatric Association (APA) (www.psychiatry.org) has some useful general info about the field, including some video interviews with psychiatrists practicing in a variety of treatment settings (see http://www.psychiatry.org/about-apa--psychiatry/more-about-psychiatry/more-about-psychiatry- ). Most importantly, talk to as many residents and practicing psychiatrists as possible to learn more about the life and why it is such a special field within medicine.

  12. How important is each the following for admission to a competitive program?

 

Very Important

Somewhat Important

Not Important

Comments

Extracurricular/
volunteer work

x

 

 

 

Research/publications

 

x

 

 

Honors in third year

 

x

 

 

AOA

 

x

x

 

Subinternship

x

 

 

 

Externship

 

x

 

 

Radiation Oncology

Contact Radiation Oncology Advisors


NON-CONFIDENTIAL

 

 

CONFIDENTIAL

 

 


Statistics on UCSF students in 2018-19 who were matched into Radiation Oncology residency programs:

POST-MATCH REPORT  

  1. What can students do in the 1st and 2nd years to explore and/or prepare for this career?
    As radiation oncology generally is not highlighted as part of the core preclinical curriculum, students should seek out opportunities to spend time within the radiation oncology department. This may be most easily accomplished by shadowing one of the attending physicians or residents within the department over the course of a few days or weeks or choosing an LCE instructor within the Radiation Oncology Department.
  2. What common variations exist in the length/content of residency programs for this career?
    U.S. radiation oncology residency training programs currently consist of one year of internal medicine, surgical, or transitional internship, followed by four years of radiation oncology specific training. Residency training generally is structured by rotations within the various anatomic subsites (Breast, GU, CNS, Peds, etc.) every few months, with several months of elective time set aside for research and rotations within related departments such as radiology and medical oncology.What common variations exist in this career after training? Most graduating residents will begin careers as attending physicians in either academics or private practice. There are some 1-2 year fellowships in select areas of radiation oncology including pediatrics, stereotactic radiotherapy, proton therapy, and brachytherapy, for example.
  3. What common variations exist in this career after training?
    After training, careers encompass full-time lab-based positions, academic positions, and positions in private practice.
  4. What is a typical work day for someone in this field?
    An 8-10 hour workday is standard and may involve new patient consultations, follow up clinic, tumor boards, treatment planning, quality and safety rounds, special procedures in the operating room, and care of patients currently receiving radiotherapy treatment, as well as teaching and research in the academic setting.
  5. What is the culture of this career?  
    The culture is highly collegial as care of cancer patients is fundamentally interdisciplinary, typified by coordination and collaboration among members of a large treatment team including radiation oncologists, surgeons, medical oncologists, radiologists, nurses, therapists, physicists, and dosimetrists.
  6. How compatible is this career with raising a family? How is this different for men and women?
    The field is highly compatible with family life. The field is largely practiced in an ambulatory clinic setting with time available for family and professional development outside of the structure clinic workweek.
  7. What are the most important qualities or character traits for a person in this field?
    The core character traits of successful and content radiation oncologists do not differ from other physicians—compassion, thoughtfulness, diligence, meticulousness, and approachability are all important qualities. One does not need to have an affinity for physics to thrive in this field, although many members of the field are attracted to ever-evolving technological components of radiotherapy delivery.
  8. How competitive are the residency programs in this field?
    Residency programs in radiation oncology are highly competitive.
  9. How competitive is the job market after residency?
    The job market is favorable for both academic and private practice careers. Job applicants should be flexible as to the particular disease subsite(s) focus upon initially entering the job market.
  10. What programs have been popular among UCSF applicants, or how should applicants go about considering programs?
    Fourth year medical student should participate in the radiation oncology clerkship both at UCSF and potentially one or two other academic center to gain perspective on potential residency programs.
  11. What resources (eg, websites, books, professional groups) would you recommend for students interested in learning more about this field?
    The Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology (ARRO), as part of the American Society of Therapeutic Radiation Oncology (ASTRO), has resources for medical students wishing to learn about the field at https://www.astro.org/ARRO/Future-Residents/Index.aspx
  12. How important is each the following for admission to a competitive program?
     
      Very Important Somewhat Important Not Important Comments
    Extracurricular/
    volunteer work
    x      
    Research/publications x      
    Honors in third year x      
    AOA x      
    Subinternship x      
    Externship x      
Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery

Contact Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery Advisors


NON-CONFIDENTIAL

 

 

CONFIDENTIAL

 

 

 


  1. What can students do in the 1st and 2nd years to explore and/or prepare for this career?
    ​Meet with faculty - they are always receptive to students
    Shadow in the OR
    Come to journal club (3rd Tuesday evening)
    Read the plastic surgery journal or a basic textbook
     
  2. What common variations exist in the length/content of residency programs for this career?
    There are two paths for residency in plastic surgery:
    Integrated (categorical) - admitted from medical school to six year residency in plastic surgery, basically 2-3 years of general surgery and 3 dedicated years of plastic surgery
    Independent - three years of plastic surgery training following full training in any other surgical specialty (usually general surgery, but people have done PS after OHNS, ortho, oral surgery, ophthalmology, even neurosurgery)
     
  3. What common variations exist in this career after training?
    There are fellowships for additional training (all one year) in microvascular surgery, hand, craniofacial, pediatric plastic surgery and cosmetic surgery. Many plastic surgeons in different settings may do a mix of these often including cosmetic surgery but in some places there may be a focus on specific practice. After fellowship or residency, variations are the usual - academic vs. private practice, employment in a group (e.g. Kaiser) vs. self-employed.
     
  4. What is a typical work day for someone in this field?
    Highly variable depending on the practice - some mix of clinic visits and operating room. Many plastic surgeons in private practice have their own operating suite esp for cosmetic procedures so it is easier to mix clinic with OR on a given day. Microsurgery and complex craniofacial cases can be long days with cases that can take 8-12 hours; hand cases tend to be shorter with more volume.
     
  5. What is the culture of this career?
    Plastic surgery is unique in that it is a specialty devoted to a concept rather than an anatomic area; problem solving is critical for evaluating multiple surgical approaches to a problem and coming up with the best solution. This means that there is overlap with many other specialties and that frequently one is doing reconstruction with other surgeons. Therefore, the culture is one that promotes excellence and technical virtuosity, creative thinking, and cooperation with other surgical specialists.
     
  6. How compatible is this career with raising a family? How is this different for men and women?
    Like any career, this is what you make it. There are so many variables in practice models and career choices that is difficult to generalize. In general, a surgical career probably puts more stress on family life than with other fields, not necessarily different for men and women.
     
  7. What are the most important qualities or character traits for a person in this field?
    Perfectionist
    Enjoy the operating room, technical aspects of surgery
    Inquiring mind, synthetic thought process
    Good with patients
     
  8. How competitive are the residency programs in this field?
    Statistically, plastic surgery is one of the most competitive residency matches; there are about 2x times number of applicants to the number of positions. Plastic surgery has the highest average Step I scores of any specialty.
     
  9. How competitive is the job market after residency?
    It depends greatly on the geographical area - as with many specialties, the SF Bay Area is the most competitive place in the country. In other areas of the country there are plenty of opportunities for plastic surgeons who are willing to do complex reconstruction. Cosmetic surgery requires time to develop a practice and is probably more competitive in most major urban areas.
     
  10. What programs have been popular among UCSF applicants, or how should applicants go about considering programs?
    There are about 50 programs that are currently integrated and are taking medical students directly into categorical positions. Students from UCSF have tended to gravitate toward the programs on the West Coast - U Wash, Oregon, UCLA, USC, Loma Linda, and of course UCSF. Top-tier programs require a very strong medical school record, high USMLE scores, publications, etc.
     
  11. What resources (eg, websites, books, professional groups) would you recommend for students interested in learning more about this field?
    The American Council for Academic Plastic Surgery (ACAPS) has an excellent website with resources about programs: http://www.acaplasticsurgeons.org/
    Basic reading - the primary journal is called Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery; a good general textbook is Grabb and Smith (2 volumes)
     
  12. How important is each the following for admission to a competitive program?
  Very Important Somewhat Important Not Important
Extracurricular/volunteer work   x  
Research/publications x    
Honors in third year x    
Subinternship   x  
Externship   x  
Surgery

Contact Surgery Advisors


NON-CONFIDENTIAL

General

 

Preliminary

 

 

CONFIDENTIAL

General

 

 


Statistics on UCSF students in 2018-19 who were matched into Surgery residency programs:

POST-MATCH REPORT  

  1. What can students do in the 1st and 2nd years to explore and/or prepare for this career?
    During the first year, students should pay close attention to anatomy. The goal for surgically minded students is to begin to understand the importance of how surgery is based on anatomy. Paying attention and doing an excellent job in basic anatomy introduction is extremely important. In addition, students can enroll in the Surgical Skills elective during the first year, the OR Assist elective. In addition, students can go to the Homeless Clinic to get an idea on how to work with patients. It is also important for the first-year medical students to look for research opportunities that they can do after the first year with faculty who has a common interest. Second-year students can also work towards helping work with the Surgical Interest Group at UCSF. It is a great opportunity to get exposure to work with the Department of Surgery.
     
  2. What common variations exist in the length/content of residency programs for this career?
    The basic clinical training in General Surgery is five years. For most programs or academically based the length of training is seven years. During those two years, residents typically will do research training in academic programs. Research training can be basic science, clinical research, outcome research, and educational research. Many residents also do international work and get a Degree in Masters in Public Health, Masters in Public Policy, Masters in Education and many other areas. The residents have recently gotten much more flexibility in pursuing their goals.  
     
  3. What common variations exist in this career after training?
    The field of general surgery is quiet vast. Currently there are approximately thirteen fellowships in general surgery alone. These fellowships are anywhere from one to three years after finishing the formal training in general surgery.

    There are many changes that are taking place in the structure of surgical training. These changes included Cardiothoracic Surgery. There are now programs that take students as interns and train them in cardiac surgery for five years. Plastic Surgery training consists of three years of General Surgery and three years of Plastic Surgery. Students can now match into Vascular Surgery programs. This means that you can finish your training in less time and qualify to practice. These residents will not receive certification in general surgery but they will be certified to practice in their specialty.
     
  4. What is a typical work day for someone in this field?
    There is no typical work day in the field. It depends on where you practice. If you are in private practice, you spend most of your day working in your office or rounding on patients. You spend a fair amount of time operating. In academic practice, you can divide your time between research, teaching, administrative duties, as well as operating.
     
  5. What is the culture of this career?
    It is really a fast pace and exciting. It is really amazing to be able to provide surgical care to patients no matter what stage you are on your career.
     
  6. How compatible is this career with raising a family? How is this different for men and women?
    There isn’t variation in respect to the amount of work hours faculty and attending work. There are some opportunities for part-time practice if you are interested in pursuing that. If you are an academic surgeon, the hours are long but they are really exciting at the practice. It is quite different than in the past where in fact you worked quite a number of hours and not an 80 hour work week and most of the number of hours are reduced that now are worked by practitioners.
     
  7. What are the most important qualities or character traits for a person in this field?
    Absolute honesty is really essential in terms of great interpersonal skills. A strong knowledge base in anatomy and the ability to think in your feet are essential qualities.
     
  8. How competitive are the residency programs in this field?
    University-based academic surgical residencies are extremely competitive. Community residency is also competitive. It is important to do really well on your Step I and Step II scores so it is important to focus on doing a great job there.
     
  9. How competitive is the job market after residency?
    There is a shortage of surgeons projected in the future for many years.
     
  10. What programs have been popular among UCSF applicants, or how should applicants go about considering programs?
    This is a difficult question; no one program is popular with our students. There are hundreds of programs all around the country.
     
  11. What resources (e.g., websites, books, professional groups) would you recommend for students interested in learning more about this field?
    Become a medical student member of the American College of Surgeons. There is a program that is dedicated to medical students that is run by the Medical Student Education Committee. You can check out on the website: http://www.facs.org/education/medicalstudents.html/
     
  12. How important is each of the following for admission to a competitive program?
     
      Very Important Somewhat Important Not Important Comments
    Extracurricular/
    volunteer work
    x      
    Research/publications x      
    Honors in third year   x    
    AOA   x   Helpful but not essential
    Sub-internship x      
    Externship   x    
Urology

Contact Urology Advisors


CONFIDENTIAL

 

 

 

 


Statistics on UCSF students in 2018-19 who were matched into Urology residency programs:

POST-MATCH REPORT  

  1. What can students do in the 1st and 2nd years to explore and/or prepare for this career?
    Since matching in urology is a highly competitive process, excellent performance in the basic science curriculum and high scores on USMLE Step 1 are both very important. Getting involved in a publishable research project and shadowing practicing urologists can also be helpful in understanding the field and getting exposure early on.
     
  2. What common variations exist in the length/content of residency programs for this career?
    Urology residencies are typically 5 or 6 years long. Most programs have at least 1 year of general surgery training (internship) and 4 years of urology residency. Some programs have an additional year of training that is typically for research. UCSF has 1 year of general surgery (PGY-1), 4 years of urology residency (PGY-2-4 and PGY-6), and 1 year of research (PGY-5).
     
  3. What common variations exist in this career after training?
    Urology offers a wide range of career choices. Some urologists begin practicing general urology immediately after completion of residency and others decide to pursue fellowship training (typically 1-2 additional years). Some examples of fellowships in urology include pediatrics, endourology, minimally invasive surgery, oncology, andrology and sexual medicine, female pelvic medicine and reconstructive surgery, and male reconstruction, to name a few.
     
  4. What is a typical work day for someone in this field?
    
This will vary widely depending on specific career choices, but most urologists have their time divided between the office and operating room. Office time often includes seeing new and return patients and can also include several office-based procedures including cystoscopy, transrectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsies, imaging procedures, and urodynamics, to name a few.
     
  5. What is the culture of this career?
    Urologists have a reputation for being “happy” surgeons who enjoy a good quality of life. They are often strongly motivated individuals who enjoy both operating and longitudinal relationships with their patients.
     
  6. How compatible is this career with raising a family? How is this different for men and women?
 Many urologists, both men and women, have successful family lives. More women than ever are entering the field and many residencies are up to 50% women. Additionally, many residents, both men and women, have children during residency.
     
  7. What are the most important qualities or character traits for a person in this field?
    Motivation, hard work and passion are all important in the field of urology. Additionally, urologists typically enjoy operating and using emerging technologies in the operating room such as robotics, laparoscopy, and endoscopy.
     
  8. How competitive are the residency programs in this field?
    
Urology is one of the most competitive residencies to match into. The national match rate was 64% in 2014 and no residency positions went unmatched. Of note, urology is an early match: registration June-December, rank list deadline early January, match results released later in January.
     
  9. How competitive is the job market after residency?
    This, of course, depends on timing and on what type of position one is looking for. Overall, there is a shortage of urologists in the workplace, and the job market is quite favorable.
     
  10. What programs have been popular among UCSF applicants, or how should applicants go about considering programs?
    
We are happy to discuss this question in person.
     
  11. What resources (eg, websites, books, professional groups) would you recommend for students interested in learning more about this field?
    The American Urological Association is the governing body for urologists: https://www.auanet.org/
    Urology Match has excellent information about the application process: http://www.urologymatch.com/ 
  12. How important is each the following for admission to a competitive program?
  Very important Somewhat important Not important
Extracurricular/volunteer work   x  
Research/publications x    
Honors in third year x    
AOA x    
Subinternship x    
Externship x    
Other: Performance on USMLE Step 1 x    
Vascular Surgery

Contact Vascular Surgery Advisors


NON-CONFIDENTIAL

 

 


What can students do in the 1st and 2nd years to explore and/or prepare for this career?

There are currently several opportunities for pre-clinical medical students to explore vascular surgery. The Department of Surgery offers an elective every fall quarter (SURG 160.10 – Introduction to Vascular and Cardiovascular Interventions) that introduces students to vascular surgery. Students who participate in this elective are also offered opportunities to shadow vascular surgeons in clinic and in the operating room. In addition to this elective, students are welcome to email vascular surgery faculty to set up a time to join them in clinic and the operating room.

The Division of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery has robust basic science as well as translational and clinical research programs. Vascular surgery faculty are very enthusiastic about mentoring students through research projects, and have mentored previous students in the yearlong and summer RAPtr programs. An ideal time to get involved in research is the summer between the first and second years of medical school. However, students are welcome and encouraged to work on clinical research projects alongside their pre-clinical coursework, if interested. Previous students have also participated in dedicated year-long research projects within the Division. Meeting with individual faculty members is the best way to explore potential research opportunities and get involved in research projects.

What common variations exist in the length/content of residency programs for this career?

There are currently two training pathways to become a vascular surgeon. The traditional pathway, also known as the “5+2” traditional fellowship, consists of a general surgery residency (5 years of clinical training, with optional research time) followed by a vascular surgery fellowship (usually 2 years), which results in a total of 7-9 years of training after graduation from medical school. This route allows for eligibility for board certification in both general surgery and vascular surgery, which is important if you are interested in private practice or rural surgery, and plan on practicing both general and vascular surgery. This route is supported by several decades of experience and graduates.

The integrated pathway, also known as the “0+5” fellowship, consists of a direct match into a vascular surgery residency program from medical school. Although the curriculum differs between institutions, these programs typically consist of 24 months of general surgery training followed by 36 months of vascular surgery training. These programs are typically 5 years in length, however, some programs have mandatory or optional research time, which may extend the training period.

Both pathways are accredited by the ACGME. However, the integrated pathway is a much newer pathway and first received accreditation in 2006. There are currently only a handful of graduates from each integrated residency program and several residency programs have yet to graduate their entering class. When choosing a pathway, it is important to understand your commitment to vascular surgery as well as your future career goals. Graduation from an integrated program will limit you to practicing vascular surgery exclusively. In a general surgery residency, you would have several additional years to decide on a subspecialty. Previously published data suggest similar operative experience, research experience, and confidence entering independent practice between graduates of the integrated and traditional programs. Vascular surgery faculty are happy to help guide you through this decision.

What common variations exist in this career after training?

Once vascular surgery training is complete, most graduates choose not to pursue additional training. However, graduates of the traditional pathway are eligible to receive training and board certification in any other sub-specialty of general surgery (e.g. acute care, transplant, cardiothoracic, etc.), if interested. There are also limited opportunities to receive training, but without additional board certification, in complex aortic surgery or complex endovascular techniques.

What is a typical work day for someone in this field?

A typical work day would vary depending on the practice setting. Most vascular surgeons spend 1-2 days in clinic and 2-3 days in the operating room per week. In an academic setting, 1-2 days a week may be dedicated to research and other academic responsibilities.

Some surgeons choose to focus on complex aortic pathology and would spend more time in the hospital and in the operating room. Others focus on venous disease and hemodialysis access and might spend more time in the clinic or stand-alone outpatient procedural centers. Some practices incorporate elements of each of these. The cases, hours, and call schedule vary between practice settings, but most days begin before 7AM and end around 6PM at least five days a week. The reported average hours worked per week is 71.1.

What is the culture of this career?

Vascular surgery is a fast-paced, exciting, and growing field that is rapidly becoming more diverse. However, vascular surgery is very demanding and tends to attract people who are hard-working, dedicated, and driven to provide the best surgical and medical care that they can for their patients.

How compatible is this career with raising a family? How is this different for men and women?

Vascular surgeons have families, hobbies, and interests outside of surgery. Although women are still underrepresented in vascular surgery, there are more women entering vascular surgery now than ever.

What are the most important qualities or character traits for a person in this field?

Vascular disease is diverse, complex, and often influenced by many medical, social, and personal factors. Patience, kindness, empathy, and an ability to communicate effectively are all characteristics that are helpful in addressing all of these aspects of vascular care. Vascular surgery is also a very technical field that rewards those with manual dexterity.

Vascular surgeons are vascular specialists and care for patients even when they are not surgical candidates. As such, vascular surgeons are invested in the long-term care of their patients and are interested in longitudinal relationships. Vascular surgeons also commonly work in large multidisciplinary teams within the clinic and the operating room and should have strong interpersonal skills.

How competitive are the residency programs in this field?

Matching into a vascular surgery fellowship from a general surgery residency is moderately competitive. There is generally the same number of positions offered as there are applicants. In 2018, only 66% of positions were filled by United States Medical Graduates and a handful of positions went unfilled.

Integrated vascular surgery residencies currently have a very limited number of positions (60 total positions in 2017) and typically have more than 100 applicants annually. In 2017, 80% of positions were filled by United States Medical Graduates and nearly all positions were filled by the Match. Integrated vascular surgery is generally regarded as a very competitive specialty to match into.

How competitive is the job market after residency?

As the United States population is aging and living longer, there is a projected shortage of vascular surgeons. The integrated pathway was created to help address these needs. Vascular surgery has a very positive job outlook.

What programs have been popular among UCSF applicants, or how should applicants go about considering programs?

When choosing integrated vascular surgery programs, it is important to select programs that are congruent with your career interests. Several programs are more oriented towards students who would like to become academic vascular surgeons. These programs either require or offer time for dedicated research or advanced degrees, which will extend the training period. Other programs do not have these opportunities. It is also important to assess the number of cases that residents are completing by the time they graduate to ensure adequate operative experience. Vascular surgery faculty are happy to help guide you through the process of selecting programs that best fit your interests.

What resources (e.g. websites, books, professional groups) would you recommend for students interested in learning more about this field?

The Society for Vascular Surgery is an excellent resource for students interested in vascular surgery. The Society offers medical student membership, research scholarships, travel scholarships, and other opportunities for medical students to get involved in vascular surgery. Attending the Vascular Annual Meeting is an excellent way to quickly gain exposure, knowledge, and insights into the field of vascular surgery. The Society for Vascular Surgery offers more than one hundred scholarships to attend this meeting every year, as well as a robust program dedicated to students. The Society also offers information about how to be a successful applicant to the traditional vascular surgery fellowships and integrated vascular surgery residency programs. The Western Vascular Society is a regional society which also offers scholarships to medical students to attend their annual meeting.

How important is each the following for admission to a competitive program?

 

Very Important

Somewhat Important

Not Important

Comments

Extracurricular/
volunteer work

 

X

 

 

Research/publications

X

 

 

Ideally in vascular surgery

Honors in third year

X

 

 

 

AOA

 

X

 

 

Sub-internship

X

 

 

 

Externship

 

X

 

 

Other
 

 

 

 

A demonstrated interest in vascular surgery is highly recommended